Epimedium 2012

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Looking forward to seeing photos of the leaves.

From Google maps, this is what Azumino, Nagano Prefecture, Japan, looks like:

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

Looking forward to seeing photos of the leaves.

Voici  ;)

Had to pot him up today, but all the potting soil and compost I had was frozen solid, real fun to get soil defrosted inside the house  :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Well, that foliage certainly disqualifies it from being a "grandiflorum" type.  Based on the leaf shape, evergreen habit, and noticeably bullate/veined character, it looks just like an Epimedium sempervirens type.

However, since it is already beginning to show up in the trade as a grandiflorum cultivar, and with a location name possibly mistaken as a cultivar name, I fear the misidentification might persist and become widespread.

Wim, thanks for posting the photos.  Now I can't wait (but, will have to wait) to see the flowers.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Anyone ever heard about an Epimedium (grandiflorum) 'Kusudama'. Or even better, maybe someone has a picture of this form?
A friend of mine has this Epi in her nursery, but she forgot to take pictures last year.

The only pic I could find of this cultivar was here: http://www.bluetendatenbank.de/web/Epimedium-,1,100,2546.html

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wim, you certainly come up with some of the most obscure Epimedium cultivars ;)

Listed as a form of grandiflorum in this link (E. grandiflorum 'Kusudama'):
http://www.florius.cz/semetin/eng/a58e.htm

The photo in your link shows a young plant, or at least, not a mature plant, hard to say much about it based on a few leaves.

I was curious about what "Kusudama" refers to; lots of references to origami come up, I believe it is a style of origami:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kusudama

From this site, more is said about Kusudama origami:
http://www.theorigamipapershop.com/c-156-kusudama-origami-paper.aspx?gcl...
"Kusudama origami is made from a number of identical origami shapes that are glued or sewn together to form a ball.  The word Kusudama is made from a combination of two Japanese words kusuri meaning medicine and tama meaning ball."

Under fair use provision, here is a photo of an origami Epimedium plant, that comes up under a search for Epimedium Kusudama, screen capture from the following web site:
http://www.oriland.com/about/displays/exhibits.asp?category=spain2007&model=09&name=San%20Lorenzo%20de%20El%20Escorial,%20Spain,%202007

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

Wim, you certainly come up with some of the most obscure Epimedium cultivars ;)

Yes, that's one of my hobbies  ;D ;D I just have a very good friend with a lot of (obscure) Epimediums  ;) ;)

McDonough wrote:

I was curious about what "Kusudama" refers to; lots of references to origami come up, I believe it is a style of origami:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kusudama

From this site, more is said about Kusudama origami:
http://www.theorigamipapershop.com/c-156-kusudama-origami-paper.aspx?gcl...
"Kusudama origami is made from a number of identical origami shapes that are glued or sewn together to form a ball.  The word Kusudama is made from a combination of two Japanese words kusuri meaning medicine and tama meaning ball."

Always very interesting to find the meaning of a Japanese name, thanks Mark!

McDonough wrote:

Under fair use provision, here is a photo of an origami Epimedium plant, that comes up under a search for Epimedium Kusudama, screen capture from the following web site:
http://www.oriland.com/about/displays/exhibits.asp?category=spain2007&model=09&name=San%20Lorenzo%20de%20El%20Escorial,%20Spain,%202007

Somehow I don't think it's that one  ;D ;D

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I think I can make those origami pseudo-epi flowers, but I've never seen origami fritillaria before...  :o

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Saori
Saori's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-10-10

McDonough wrote:

Wim, you certainly come up with some of the most obscure Epimedium cultivars ;)

No kidding, Wim! :D

Since it's a Japanese name, I thought that I could easily find a picture of the flower if I searched in Japanese, but the only site I could manage to find is http://www.ishidaseikaen.com/webshop/products/detail.php?product_id=3394

Sadly, no image... (although they do offer it for 2,100 yen for a four-inch pot).

From the beautiful Pacific Northwest, USA,
where summer is mild and dry but winter is dark and very wet... USDA Zone 7b or 8 (depends on the year)

 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Once again I find myself evaluating "evergreenness" of epimediums, this winter being a particularly trying one for evergreen plants in New England, Northeastern USA.  This winter has been highly unusual for two reasons, it has been virtually snowless (just a 3-4 negligible inches of disappearing snow), and it's been roller-coaster ride of unusual mild weather, swinging to deep freeze and dessicating high winds, back to mild above-freezing weather.  I'm realizing that the evergreen character of many epimediums has some dependency on winter snow cover, because this nearly snowless winter has shown much more widespread foliar damage or winter kill on evergreen Epimediums than I've seen in the last decade.  Those that showed no foliar damage whatsoever the last 7-8 years, such as E. pubigerum & E. pinnatum ssp. colchicum, are rather leaf-burned this year.

Yet, a few species still look totally unfazed.  Here are some photos taken today, Feb. 10, 2012.

Left:  E. stellulatum.   Right: Epimedium 'The Giant'

Left: E. brachyrrhizum (the best winter eppie!), right: E. wushanense "Spiny-leaved form", showing some winter burn  

E. membranaceum x brevicornu; I have several plants of this cross, and they are more evergreen that both parents.  Not pictured is E. ilicifolium, still looking perfectly fine with green evergreen leaves.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I wonder, Mark, if you are going to have the "problem" I have here every year: when the spring air is warm, but the the frozen soil lags long into the season.  Marginal evergreens of all kinds tend to look fine until spring begins.

What is the frost depth in the soil now, compare to most years?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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