Epimedium 2012

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Geo F-W
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WimB wrote:

The one in the picture is one of Marc Libert's plants? Very nice....he seems to continue the great tradition of the botanical garden of the university of Ghent, where he works!

Absolutely. He earned many nice selections. Thierry sells one of them, 'ML405' aka 'Ghent Orange', nice one.

WimB wrote:

I think he named a big white one last year, I'll ask Daniëlle when I visit her this week, If I remember correctly she had one of those in her garden last year.....

Yes indeed, it's 'Splendide White', it's a really big one, more than 1,50 meters. A beautiful selection of 'Splendide'. But I don't have any photo of it.
He has 23 Thalictrums to its catalog yet.

It's 'Purple Rain' on my photo Mark, 'Splendide' is paler.

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.
Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/

Geo F-W
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McDonough wrote:

Geoffrey, is the photo of the Thalictrum hybrid showing 'Splendide' or 'Purple Rain', sure is something special.

By the way, does anyone have experience with Epimedium elatum?  It's not particularly attractive as a flowering plant, foliage is nice but flowers are few and tiny, but it has the attribute of being among the tallest species, reaching 4' (1.3 m), and could be an asset in a hybridization program.  Isn't much information out there on this species, it's in the Stearn monograph, and in a few links:

E. elatum
http://www.flickr.com/photos/arifk11/5387226746/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/arifk11/5387549964/in/photostream/

Description and drawing from Flora of Pakistan
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=116046&flora_id=5
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=5&taxon_id=250064598

As Wim, never seen IRL.
Maybe Koen actually test it indeed, he should be asked.
I'll ask to Thierry.

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.
Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Geo wrote:

WimB wrote:

The one in the picture is one of Marc Libert's plants? Very nice....he seems to continue the great tradition of the botanical garden of the university of Ghent, where he works!

Absolutely. He earned many nice selections. Thierry sells one of them, 'ML405' aka 'Ghent Orange', nice one.

Indeed, that one I know!! Daniëlle grows it too!

Geo wrote:

WimB wrote:

I think he named a big white one last year, I'll ask Daniëlle when I visit her this week, If I remember correctly she had one of those in her garden last year.....

Yes indeed, it's 'Splendide White', it's a really big one, more than 1,50 meters. A beautiful selection of 'Splendide'. But I don't have any photo of it.
He has 23 Thalictrums to its catalog yet.

It's 'Purple Rain' on my photo Mark, 'Splendide' is paler.

Yes, that's the one, both are on my "to buy" list for this year, they are "splendid"  :rolleyes: :rolleyes:  ;D

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Geo wrote:

McDonough wrote:

Geoffrey, is the photo of the Thalictrum hybrid showing 'Splendide' or 'Purple Rain', sure is something special.

By the way, does anyone have experience with Epimedium elatum?  It's not particularly attractive as a flowering plant, foliage is nice but flowers are few and tiny, but it has the attribute of being among the tallest species, reaching 4' (1.3 m), and could be an asset in a hybridization program.  Isn't much information out there on this species, it's in the Stearn monograph, and in a few links:

E. elatum
http://www.flickr.com/photos/arifk11/5387226746/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/arifk11/5387549964/in/photostream/

Description and drawing from Flora of Pakistan
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=116046&flora_id=5
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=5&taxon_id=250064598

As Wim, never seen IRL.
Maybe Koen actually test it indeed, he should be asked.
I'll ask to Thierry.

I'll ask Koen, Daniëlle doesn't grow it, of that I'm sure!

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

This is what Koen says about this plant (which he doesn't grow!):

"E. elatum is  not garden worthy according to Mikinori Ogisu, who went to see the plant in the wild in Kashmir. There's one plant of this species in Kew Gardens, where it is slowly dying! Don't waste any energy on trying to grow this one!"

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

WimB wrote:

This is what Koen says about this plant (which he doesn't grow!):

"E. elatum is  not garden worthy according to Mikinori Ogisu, who went to see the plant in the wild in Kashmir. There's one plant of this species in Kew Gardens, where it is slowly dying! Don't waste any energy on trying to grow this one!"

Probably true, the link I gave showing the plant in flower, shows that the flowers are virtually insignificant, but the foliage is very attractive, crinkly textured, and of course, a tall stature.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/arifk11/5387549964/in/photostream/

In terms of hybridization, the wider the gene pool the better, and sometimes a surprising characteristic can be imparted to hybrid progeny.  Case in point, this winter was a nearly snowless winter, thus a true test of the "evergreen" characteristic on the various epimediums listed as being evergreen.  Most did not fair too well this year, even E. wushanense became totally browned.  So, last weekend I took stock of which ones remained evergreen in reasonable form, and trimmed all the browned foliage off the others, only the following had foliage unfazed by winter dessication:  ilicifolium, sp. "the Giant", a davidii hybrid (not davidiii itself), brachyrrhizum, stellulatum, and all of my E. membranaceum x brevicornu hybrids!  It is surprising that the hybrids would be so reliably evergreen, when membranaceum foliage mostly behaves "semi-evergreen" here and brevicornu is deciduous.  Not sure why these hybrids are so winter resilient, but I'm not complaining. :D  

Hmmm, there is a possibility that my estimate of the putative E. membranaceum x brevicornu hybrids is in error; now seeing the E. stellulatum over-wintered foliage.  The seedlings were self-sown ones, found directly under the canopy of a large E. brevicornu plant, with E. membrananceum growing so close to it that flowert stems intertwined.  My hybrid plants are 4-5 yrs old now, and at that time, while I had E. stellulatum, it was planted far away in another part of the garden, and it was only a few years ago I moved that plant closer to where brevicornu and membranaceum are located. Logistically, it seems unlikely that stellulatum was involved, but I can't rule out what the bees might do.  So, I'll take a closer look this year to determine whethjer my plants are membranaceum x brevicornu or membranaceum x stellulatum.

Left:    E. brachyrrhizum over-wintered foliage, in great shape.
Right:  membranaceum x brevicornu? or x stellulatum?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

With an exceptionally early spring, followed by a record-breaking week of warm to hot July-like sunny weather, the epimediums are sending forth spring growth and their initially coiled flower stems.  The first to open a few flowers here is typically E. x versicolor 'Versicolor', a few blooms open today, but also beginning to bloom is E. pubescens "Shaanxi form" and E. "Asiatic Hybrid".  Now I'm worried about the sudden return to reality, with overnight temperatures predicted to plummet down to 19 F (-7 C) and 25 F in the upcoming couple of days.  I have no doubt that those "eppies" with just show tight growth buds will be fine, but those coaxed into soft precocious growth full of buds might be at risk of being whacked by frost.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
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In flower here today, the big unknown (not grandiflorum) Epimedium 'Azumino'  :-\

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hmmm, looks like a typical lavender-ish sempervirens bloom, I find that sempervirens can have more incurved or downturned spurs as compared to grandiflorum, but just a generalization.  Was it worth the wait?  ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

Hmmm, looks like a typical lavender-ish sempervirens bloom, I find that sempervirens can have more incurved or downturned spurs as compared to grandiflorum, but just a generalization.  Was it worth the wait?  ;)

Not very special, isn't it?? I'll keep it, but if I had a smaller garden, it's not one I would grow!

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

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