Building a Bog

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Plummer
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-10-01
Building a Bog

I am seriously considering transforming a three meter by one meter by a half-meter deep section of my front perennial bed into a bog. I would appreciate any input as well as sources for bog plants.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

It would be helpful to know the area in which you live for recommending sources.  We order water lilies, etc. from Moore's Water Gardens which is in Ontario... they have some bog plants as well.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Martin Tversted
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-03-24

I just made a bog a bit larger twomonths ago for carnivorous plants. Its works really well and the mosses have started to cover the surface as well as the many sundews, orchids, Lobelias, Sarracenias, Pinguiculas, ferns etc. Will make a rapport later on.

Martin

Martin Tversted
Central Jutland, Denmark Z6

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Places that sell carnivorous plants often have a variety of bog plants to choose from too. But I don't have a bog type area, so I've never really looked into actual sources.  Not knowing where you live, I don't know if Rhodohypoxis would be hardy for you, but you might be interested in checking out this thread:

Rhodohypoxis-Would you believe it's a bog plant?
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=237.0

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Plummer
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-10-01

I am in the Southern Tier of New York, just above the Pennsylvania border.

Swick
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-04-30

I'm about to try creating a small bog too.  I live in Anchorage, AK, so no problem finding lots of desirable plants for such an environment.  But HOW, that is my question.  Is there a good reference for the nitty grit of how to construct such an environment?  I wonder how to create some drainage and water movement while still keeping enough moisture present.

Zone 3/4

Martin Tversted
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-03-24

Here is a picture of my new bog:
http://succulentsonice.blogspot.com/

I digged a hole 5 x 3 x 0,6 meters. I placed some EPDM rubberliner to keep in the water and filled it up with the soil again. I live on old heathland and the local soil is sandy and acid (I can plant ericas or Rhododendron directly in it or just use it directly for Droseras if wet). On top I used a 10 cm of peat and planted living sphagnum mosses.

Its filled with rainwater and when it rains a lot there standing 2-3 cm of water in the center of the bog above soil surface.

The edge are wood from local Pinus sylvestris trees.
Martin

Martin Tversted
Central Jutland, Denmark Z6

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Kathleen, the bogs I have had the pleasure of exploring (e.g. boardwalk interpretive trails in national parks, and general slogging around through muskeggy areas) haven't had much in the way of flow or drainage.  Having said that though, in a garden environment, I can understand that one might want to widen the conditions somewhat to be able to grow more moisture-loving (though not strictly "bog") plants.  Hmm, a bog garden would be a nice addition...

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Welcome to the forum, Klondike Kate!
(Love that nickname)

I don't know a whole lot about artificial bogs, but most find that some sort of drainage potential is advantageous.  Some purposely poke holes in the bottom of their EPDM (or whatever they use as a bottom liner) so water seeps slowly out.  Others place holes a little up from the bottom, so there is a permanent reservoir of water below that level.  In regions where rainfall is abundant, that constant or periodic "flushing" might replace drainage.  Just like a pond, nutrient levels are an integral part in a bog's health.  Bogs are typically very low in plant nutrition, and may be the reason why natural fens/bogs "seem" to be stagnant yet healthy.  If it is too rich, it will invite other problems.

EPDM is a heavier liner normally used on roofs, but works very well for pond or bog liners.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Nice bog, Martin.  The sundews (Drosera spp.) are fascinating.  Will you also have pitcher plants?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Martin Tversted
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-03-24

I all ready have Sarracenias. I use to keep all species ans subspecies when I had the big greenhouses, but now Im down to what can grow unprotected outside. This leave me with quite a lot of different S purpurea subspecies and local forms, forms/subspecies of flava and oreophila. X popei is also a winner here and a few other common hybrids- Besides these I have a lot of hybrids that I have sown myself and many appearently very hardy and colorfull hybrids are comming up. (all my CP material took - 20C last winter.)
The bog also contains some of my more acid/water tolerant Pings like vulgaris, grandiflora, fiori´x grandiflora rosea. I also have various forms of water tolerant Erica (tetralix etc), Andromeda, Betula nana, Lobelia dortmanna, cardinalis and a blue one.

Martin

Martin Tversted
Central Jutland, Denmark Z6

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