Some less frequently seen crucifers...

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Mark McD
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Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori, the Arabis lemmonii has really attractive foliage and an almost shrubby look to it, I'd grow that one in a minute.  I see from the USDA site there are 4 varieties.

Found more information the web site of The Burke Museum of natural History (University of Washington), with photos of Arabis lemmonii var. paddoensis which has deeper red-pink flowers, looking very attractive.

http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection.php?Genus=...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Quite a range of plants I would love to grow! But I fear they do not tolerate my climate at home :'(  (or the mainly woodland biotope . . .)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

I like crucifers a  lot--every plant in this thread is a winner! Lori, very cool to see the natives, the small number of natives I have seen (and not been able to name up till now with incomplete books) have all been white/cream..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thanks, Cohan.  Here's one I forgot (that I can actually identify, that is  ;D)... not uncommon in alpine screes here but it doesn't seem to be much in cultivation.  Smelowskia calycina is attractive for its gray, pubescent leaves, even when not in flower.
  

It's sometimes affected by rust, as you can see from the distorted flowers in this photo:

There is a multitude of other tiny, native Brassicacaea in the mountains, Draba spp., I think... apparently, to figure out what the heck they are, I will have to take my hand lens and study whether the minute hairs on the leaves are simple, cruciform, stellate, lacking, or......  :rolleyes:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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I don't think I've seen this one in person--all those I recall had simple leaves-or at least not this divided...

Here are a couple of shots from near the Columbia Icefield tourist stop off of the Icefields Parkway between Banff and Jasper, from last June 26;
This is the album with these plants, and some willows:
https://picasaweb.google.com/cactuscactus/AlbertaRockyMountainsJune26201...
(The day as a whole was something like 16 albums-- I like to make each site separate, and keep album size modest for slow internet connections!)

The first I'm sure must be a fairly well known, common plant, I just haven't yet looked in the right places to know what! There were individuals with longer and shorter leaves, but I'm pretty sure these are all the same thing, just varying with age and exposure, and maybe just innate variation besides!

     

The next I missed full flowering of, but it looked like it had been pink/purple, and had really nice leaves; just today seeing Lori's earlier pics, I'm wondering if this could be an Arabis? Unlike the first, which was very common, I think I only saw the one plant of this...

 

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Another plant, from earlier that same day, alongside Abraham Lake, a much lower elevation, but a very exposed site... growing among grasses and numerous other forbs, including several nice legumes and composites..
https://picasaweb.google.com/cactuscactus/AlbertaRockyMountainsJune262010C#

   

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have to say that Smelowskia calycina really had the prettiest leaves!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

cohan wrote:

Here are a couple of shots from near the Columbia Icefield tourist stop off of the Icefields Parkway between Banff and Jasper, from last June 26;
This is the album with these plants, and some willows:
https://picasaweb.google.com/cactuscactus/AlbertaRockyMountainsJune26201...
(The day as a whole was something like 16 albums-- I like to make each site separate, and keep album size modest for slow internet connections!)

The first I'm sure must be a fairly well known, common plant, I just haven't yet looked in the right places to know what! There were individuals with longer and shorter leaves, but I'm pretty sure these are all the same thing, just varying with age and exposure, and maybe just innate variation besides!

The next I missed full flowering of, but it looked like it had been pink/purple, and had really nice leaves; just today seeing Lori's earlier pics, I'm wondering if this could be an Arabis? Unlike the first, which was very common, I think I only saw the one plant of this...

Cohan, I would guess that both the white-flowered plant and the presumed pink-purple flowered plant are Arabis species.  Interesting seeing the progression from young plants to very showy mature plants (looking at your Picasaweb gallery too).  You have me intrigued with the 2nd Arabis, indeed with rather neat linear foliage, and for an Arabis, the fruiting stems not overly elongated... my guess is that it would be showy in flower.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Thanks, Mark, If they could be Arabis, at least that gives me a genus to check in the Flora..
The first species was quite common at that site, so it was fun to see it at all stages, and also growing in various conditions; sheltering in mats of other species, right out on the side of the moraines by itself, etc..

The second one is funny-- I found that photo right after telling Lori I hadn't seen any pink flowered species  ;D You can see a couple of the flowers at the end of the stem in the first shot, looks like just a couple of stems, not covered like the other plant, but still a really pretty species overall, more substantial looking leaves than many Brassicaceae..

I have a couple more to post once I get albums done..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mikkelsen
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-09-04

Skulski wrote:

Thanks, Cohan.  Here's one I forgot (that I can actually identify, that is  ;D)... not uncommon in alpine screes here but it doesn't seem to be much in cultivation.  Smelowskia calycina is attractive for its gray, pubescent leaves, even when not in flower.

I love Smelowskia calcynia! There is an area about 2 hours from our home where it grows in an alpine scree at 11,000'. I have collected the seed many times and although the seeds look viable when sown I have never had one germinate. I'd love to know what makes the seeds tick so I can grow this beauty. :)

Margin of the Great Basin Desert & Wasatch Mountains
4350' (1326m) Elevation; Zone 5a - 7a; 5 miles from the
climate moderating effects of The Great Salt Lake, Utah
J. Mikkelsen

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