Some less frequently seen crucifers...

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Interesting, J.  If they are not common in cultivation (? - my guess anyway), that may be one of the reasons.  I'll have to collect a few seeds and give it a try. What methods of germination have you tried with them?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I would have tried the seed outdoors over the winter - but maybe you have ;)

Can anybody help with this unknown crucifer? (Difficult to take pictures today in rain and wind!)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

You're sure its not Tanacetum? ;)
Maybe a Zizia?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

cohan wrote:

You're sure its not Tanacetum? ;)
Maybe a Zizia?

I don't think Tanacetum, but I'd go with the possibility of Zizia.  Everyone should grow a Zizia, just to have a perennial ZEE plant in the garden ;D

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Could you show a closeer view of the flowers, Trond?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I apologise for the bad quality of the picture due to rain, wind and an unstable hand ;)

But I definitely told you it is a crusifer ;D
Here are a better picture although yellow and white flowers is hard to find or the autofocus. But you get a fly too completely free ;D ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Barstow
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

I'd agree that Zizias should be more grown, but Zizia it isn't - it's an umbellifer! Your plant looks familiar, but I can't place it...

Here's my Zizia aurea, in flower at the moment:

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Ha! You know I was reading and thinking crucifer and didn't once catch my mind slip into umbellifer...lol.. as little as I know about umbellifers, I know less about crucifers (see above! and I photographed some in the mountains today, still no clues...lol).. so I have no clues for Trond's plant...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

I've for some time wanted to grow one of the mega-brassicas, Megacarpaea polyandra, one of the most commonly wild gathered food plants in the Himalaya region. I had seed from one of the seed exchanges a couple of years ago and one plant has survived, but I haven't planted it in the open garden yet. I saw it on my visit to the Gøteborg botanics growing in a woodland setting (see below). I also have two plants of Megacarpaea delavayi and seed of another species from Kazakhstan which haven't germinated yet. Anyone have experience with these or can advise on their requirements?
The second picture is of a Megacarpaea giganteum (a bit out of place in the Wendelbo bulb garden).

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Stephenb wrote:

I've for some time wanted to grow one of the mega-brassicas, Megacarpaea polyandra, one of the most commonly wild gathered food plants in the Himalaya region. I had seed from one of the seed exchanges a couple of years ago and one plant has survived, but I haven't planted it in the open garden yet. I saw it on my visit to the Gøteborg botanics growing in a woodland setting (see below). I also have two plants of Megacarpaea delavayi and seed of another species from Kazakhstan which haven't germinated yet. Anyone have experience with these or can advise on their requirements?
The second picture is of a Megacarpaea giganteum (a bit out of place in the Wendelbo bulb garden).

interesting--what part is edible, leaves?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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