Echinocereus triglochidiatus complex

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Well I guess now I don't feel so bad that mine hasn't bloomed yet after seven years.  (It is way smaller, too.)  But oh my, look what I might have to look forward to! 

Really cool  8) -I mean hot- John!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Brian_W
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-28

Greetings,

Excellent photos and information.  I'm currently growing this species from seed I got from Alplains collected in Chaffee County, Colorado at 7600ft (zone 4). I'm going to experiment with winter hardiness here in Western Montana (also zone 4).  Has anyone seen this beauty? http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/pink%20enlarged%20photo%20pages/echinocereus%20triglochidiatus%202.htm. Or how about this one? http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/pink%20enlarged%20photo%20pages/echinocereus%20triglochidiatus%204.htm.

Brian

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Brian_W wrote:

Greetings,

Excellent photos and information.  I'm currently growing this species from seed I got from Alplains collected in Chaffee County, Colorado at 7600ft (zone 4). I'm going to experiment with winter hardiness here in Western Montana (also zone 4).  Has anyone seen this beauty? http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/pink%20enlarged%20photo%20pages/echinocereus%20triglochidiatus%202.htm. Or how about this one? http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/pink%20enlarged%20photo%20pages/echinocereus%20triglochidiatus%204.htm.
Those are some good looking cactus, I hope the do good for you.

Brian

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

My seedlings of Echocereus triglochidiatus from NARGS Seed Ex seed.  So far, they have only overwintered in the refrigerator.

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Andy71
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-26

RickR wrote:

My seedlings of Echocereus triglochidiatus from NARGS Seed Ex seed.  So far, they have only overwintered in the refrigerator.
       

Coming along nicely.

Connecticut - zone 6 (humid) - 54" of rain/year

Andy71
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-26

Weiser wrote:

Here are a few shots of a Echinocereus coccineus I have had for six years now. Last year it had three or four flowers. This is it's second season of flowers. If it keeps increasing it,s flower production it will be spectacular in a couple of more seasons.
It looks like this one may be fully fertile.

Awesome! I think I would retire from gardening if I ever got a claret cup display like that.

Connecticut - zone 6 (humid) - 54" of rain/year

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Thought I'd show off a hybrid Echinocereus x lloydii (syn. Echinocereus  X roetteri), the natural interspecific hybrid between E. coccineus and E. dasyacanthus or E. triglochidiatus and E. pectinatus. I'm not quite sure which it correct. Although I think in this case I see more of a resemblance to E. dasyacantha. Do any of you know for sure which cross is correct for these hybrids or are there two separate hybrids which are listed under this name/ names? Very confusing I'm just glad the plants are not confused too and are able to produce lovely blossoms despite the confusion.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Andy71
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-26

Weiser wrote:

Thought I'd show off a hybrid Echinocereus x lloydii (syn. Echinocereus  X roetteri), the natural interspecific hybrid between E. coccineus and E. dasyacanthus or E. triglochidiatus and E. pectinatus. I'm not quite sure which it correct. Although I think in this case I see more of a resemblance to E. dasyacantha. Do any of you know for sure which cross is correct for these hybrids or are there two separate hybrids which are listed under this name/ names? Very confusing I'm just glad the plants are not confused too and are able to produce lovely blossoms despite the confusion.

From what I understand (I may be wrong) is that x roetteri refers to wild hybrids of E. coccineus and E. dasyacantha in New Mexico like around Orogrande where it is common. x lloydii is also a wild hybrid of coccineus/dasyacantha but from an area of Texas with different coccineus forms than New Mexico yielding a different looking hybrid than x roetteri.  Like you say the bottom line is the plants are awesome no matter the name.

Connecticut - zone 6 (humid) - 54" of rain/year

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Thank you Andy for the insight.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Fantastic, John! :)
Brian, I also have a couple of the high altitude Alplains collections and will be trying more-- just seedlings so far... I think all the Echinos will be marginal here, in part because of coolish summers, I wouldn't think you should have too much trouble in the right planting in balmy z4  ;D

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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