Echinocereus triglochidiatus complex

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

PK it didn't set fruit this year.  :-[ I hope it may this coming season. I think it was just too cold and the pollinators were not active. I will get my paint brushes out of storage and try my hand at pollinating it should the need arise.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The color of E. lloydii wasn't bad either! What an ardent glorious flower!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. mojavensis is one of the recognized varieties. It grows as a dense mound of stems with white interlacing spines and rich red flowers. The plants pup new heads readily and can in cultivation double the head count in a single season. The stems are not as large as found in other forms of Echinocereus triglochidiatus but the shear mass of large 500 head clumps in bloom is a sight to see.

Here are two pictures of 200< head clumps from the garden of Charles Barnum, Sparks NV.
The close ups are of a start he gave me.  It was photographed in it's second season in my garden.
You can see how it has increased in size in just two years.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Not a bad start, John!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weintraub
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-24

Add New Mexico to the states where this species grows. it can be found up to 8000 feet or so.

Barbara Weintraub
Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
6700 feet elevation - high and dry
nominally zone 5b; i think it's closer to 6a

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Great plants, love the orange x lloydii..
Some high elevation populations are supposed to be very hardy,  far lower than -17C.. I have a few seedlings I will be trying, but I think my problem with the Echinocereus in general will be a not hot enough summer...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Here are a few shots of a Echinocereus coccineus I have had for six years now. Last year it had three or four flowers. This is it's second season of flowers. If it keeps increasing it,s flower production it will be spectacular in a couple of more seasons.
It looks like this one may be fully fertile.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Weiser wrote:

Here are a few shots of a Echinocereus coccineus I have had for six years now. Last year it had three or four flowers. This is it's second season of flowers. If it keeps increasing it,s flower production it will be spectacular in a couple of more seasons.
It looks like this one may be fully fertile.

John, I think it is spectacular now! Any chance for seed if it is fertile?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

It's going to take a bucket of water to put those out.  The brighter the better. 8)

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Awesome!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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