Leptodactylon pungens

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Leptodactylon pungens

Leptodactylon pungens ssp. pulchrifolium (or now Linanthus pungens ssp. pulchrifolium, I guess) has proven impressively hardy here! From a grand total of 2 flowers last year, it has outdone itself this year with quite a few more pleasantly-scented, phlox-like blossoms.
If anyone has photos, I'd love to see what more mature, better-grown specimens look like, in the garden or in nature!

Here's the range of the species, from USDA Plants, and the second site shows its range in British Columbia, where it barely sneaks in across the border:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=LIPU11
http://linnet.geog.ubc.ca/Atlas/Atlas.aspx?sciname=Leptodactylon%20pungens

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

One more of those I had no idea existed! Seems to be a real rock garden plant. Maybe something for my summerhouse garden.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Great plant.  Have had no success with this so far.  It looked good, then collapsed during the winter of little snow cover.

CScott
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-23

There is a plant which appeared likely from a mix.
I thought it was linanthus nuttallii, but it looks much like the one you are discussing.

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Scott
I don't think your plant is Leptodactylon pungens. The nodes between the leaf clusters are too far apart. Plants I am familiar with, have nodes 1/16 - 1/8 of an inch (.125 - .062 cm) apart. They have two clusters of leaves opposite each other, angled upward toward the tip of the stem. It also appears that your plant may be annual. L. pungens is perennial. The flower looks right.
It is possible you have an annual Linanthus??

Here are some closeups of  Leptodactylon pungens.   

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Caroline, I'd say your plant is definitely Linanthus sp... (no expert here, but from having googled this genus a lot for plant IDs).  To add to the description, Leptodactylon pungens is a woody subshrub, with sharp prickles at each node.  (I'll post a better photo to show this... should show up very well at this time of year.)
Has your plant wintered over yet and is it prickly?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori wrote:

Caroline, I'd say your plant is definitely Linanthus sp... (no expert here, but from having googled this genus a lot for plant IDs).  To add to the description, Leptodactylon pungens is a woody subshrub, with sharp prickles at each node.  (I'll post a better photo to show this... should show up very well at this time of year.)
Has your plant wintered over yet and is it prickly?

Lori, I agree that it's a Linanthus (now Leptosiphon), and I posted my findings in the Plant Identification forum where Caroline also posted the mystery plant:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=813.msg12127#msg12127

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here's Leptodactylon pungens ssp. pulchrifolium taken today while it is in winter resting mode, showing the woody stems and persistent prickles:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Linanthus grandiflorus

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I've kept Leptodactylon pungens for a year on the sand bed; though it hasn't grown brilliantly it had a few flowers. I hope it may get going better next year (and the bed is protected from too much winter wet by a  high glass cover). Am trying hard to pare down my seed order this winter - pretty unsuccessfully!!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Sorry, I should have said "It's Linanthus grandiflorus."

"Trying hard to pare down my seed order ..."  Uh huh. I find that I write down everything I want and discover that the order total was several hundred dollars more than I thought it would be, and so rewrite the order, keeping the cost more reasonable, and feel very self satisifed, and then another seed list appears, and I figure that having saved so much money on the first order I can now make out another order. And so on.
I grew the leptodactylon from seed this past winter and had some nice seedlings but forgot to water them and that was that. In fact, FTW (forgetting to water) is the main cause of plant death in the garden. That labor-management problem that so often surfaces here.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

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