Opuntia fragilis

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Rick
I hope a few pads stuck to you pant legs. ;)
Boy those outcroppings are covered in them!!

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Weiser wrote:

Rick
I hope a few pads stuck to you pant legs. ;)
Boy those outcroppings are covered in them!!

Well, my aversion to the cactus with "jumping" ;) glochides may be set aside for this one, at least until I can get it to bloom and evaluate it.  It won't be a space hog like the larger opuntias.  There was an old piece of rotting wood there and I used it to reach out and touch some of the pads.  the barbed thorns did their job, attached themselves to it, and I retrieved a few pads.  That leaves two up for grabs...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Just a little tip.
Be sure and plant it were it doesn't get bumped around. They will only produce flowers after they chain/stack two or three pads high. So getting bumped around really delays the process.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Had been exciting to be stung by a cactus ;) ...in the wild, I mean. Although roses are beautiful they're not as interesting as cacti though!

Rick, the other plant in your picture - is it a grass?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Thanks, John.

Hoy wrote:

Rick, the other plant in your picture - is it a grass?

Yes, the grass looking plants are a rhizomatous grass species.  Not sure which, though.  I would have thought the Plantago patagonica would be the more interesting plant...  ;D 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

Thanks, John.

Hoy wrote:

Rick, the other plant in your picture - is it a grass?

Yes, the grass looking plants are a rhizomatous grass species.  Not sure which, though.  I would have thought the Plantago patagonica would be the more interesting plant...  ;D 

It is! I did believe that the plantago inflorescences belonged to the grass leaves :o

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Great looking Opuntias, Rick! really nice globular pads! Do you think the flowers were pink, or just faded that way? All or nearly all, Canadian Opuntia have yellow flowers (I've heard a couple reports of pinks, but not actually seen evidence) but I know there are more colours in the U.S.
the Plantago is great too, I'm very interested in that genus.. what are the leaves like? Like Trond, I only saw the grass 'leaves'

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

cohan wrote:

Great looking Opuntias, Rick! Do you think the flowers were pink, or just faded that way?

I'm glad I am not the only one who wondered about that, because we have no wild Minnesota opuntias that bloom anything but yellow.  I thought maybe I "discovered" something!  But no: I found some pics on the web of blooming yellow opuntia flowers with old flowers on the same plant that faded to pink.  Those pads in the previous photos are hardly more than an inch long, so a hybrid with a non-native  pink blooming polycantha (in the rare case that someone grew one nearby) would be extremely unlikely, I would think. 

I am still collating photos of other prairie plants from that same trip to show here.  More About the plantago then...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I suspected that was the case with this flower, I've seen pinkish faded flowers before..
Looking forward to the other plant photos, I have to get over to the travel photos section, I haven't even seen the photos of Lori's spring trip yet- my internet connection has been so poor the last many weeks, but I think it may have got a bit better....
(its taking two or three re-connections to send this message)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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