Ranunculus buchanani

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Peter George
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-03
Ranunculus buchanani

This is not a plant that is often grown, and I'm seeking whatever information about its' cultivation and potential survival here in New England. If you've had any success in growing it in the open garden outside of New Zealand, please share that information. Thank you in advance.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

George wrote:

This is not a plant that is often grown, and I'm seeking whatever information about its' cultivation and potential survival here in New England. If you've had any success in growing it in the open garden outside of New Zealand, please share that information. Thank you in advance.

Hi Peter, can't help out with cultural information, but thought I would google for some good images and provide links, so readers could see this beauty. Surprisingly, not many good photos could be found, perhaps it is overshadowed by the famous R. lyallii, with which R. buchananii will hybridize with. Both are highly desirable white-flowered ranunculus.  Based on the wealth of other alpine gems you're growing in your garden, I'm sure you'll have R. buchananii romping through your scree and lawn areas in no time ;D

http://alpine-plants-new-zealand.110mb.com/Ranunculus.htm
http://www.srgc.org.uk/bulblog/log2008/241208/Rannunculus%20buchanii.jpg
...light pink flowers, or is it the camera exposure:
http://www.eecrg.uib.no/projects/AGS_BotanyExp/NewZealand/Photos/NZ%20ga...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Hello Peter

I've recently (re)joined the NARGS and just come across your posting .Thought you might like to see some pics i took back in mid January of this year of Ranunculus buchananii in the wild which will hopefully give you an idea of it's habitat preference---While it is found on ledges and cliffs ,in my experience the most luxuriant plants are growing in fellfield ,(very chunky rock), close to snow melt.

As Mark has mentioned it hybridizes with R.lyallii ----as well as the yellow R. sericophyllus --this *latter hybrid producing some lovely cream colourings-Unfortunately snowed blocked my attempt this past season to locate *them (and my previous film pics are not worth scanning)--However i'm sure to be roaming the 'hills' up that way again early next year if you or any one else are interested.

Cheers dave   

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Wow, that is one stunning buttercup!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Todd wrote:

Wow, that is one stunning buttercup!

That's an amazing Ranunculus, fantastic shots, can't wait to see the cream color hybrids in the future.  Nice to see you Dave on the "other side of the pond"... not as much traffic here yet, but it is building.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Toole wrote:

Hello Peter

I've recently (re)joined the NARGS and just come across your posting .Thought you might like to see some pics i took back in mid January of this year of Ranunculus buchananii in the wild which will hopefully give you an idea of it's habitat preference---While it is found on ledges and cliffs ,in my experience the most luxuriant plants are growing in fellfield ,(very chunky rock), close to snow melt.

As Mark has mentioned it hybridizes with R.lyallii ----as well as the yellow R. sericophyllus --this *latter hybrid producing some lovely cream colourings-Unfortunately snowed blocked my attempt this past season to locate *them (and my previous film pics are not worth scanning)--However i'm sure to be roaming the 'hills' up that way again early next year if you or any one else are interested.

Cheers dave     

Welcome, Dave. Beautiful, beautiful Ranunculus - and an amazing site. Are there any companion plants in the area where it grows?

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Welcome Dave,
You already know my thoughts on this absolute gem ... I have only flowered it once here in the U.K. and know it to be far more difficult than R. haastii and R. insignis.  Your superb pictures certainly do it justice ... we NEED to see more please?

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That buttercup looks cool!  (temperature-wise, too)

Welcome to the forum Dave!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Thank you all for the warm welcome and comments.

Anne
I have a pic or two ,(actually hundreds in fact  :o  ) of the many companion plants found in this and other areas of Fiordland Heritage Park.

Perhaps i will start a new topic --Flora of the South Island - New Zealand and post a few ,when time allows over the following weeks.You did ask Cliff  ;D

In the meantime i guess i need to introduce myself --so will do that now under the appropriate thread.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

I may hunt for online seed sources for both Ranunculus buchananii, and Ranunculus lyallii. Are there any forumists growing either of these gems in New England or similar climates? Just wondering if it is worthwhile attempting to grow these in northeastern North America.

http://botany.cz/cs/ranunculus-lyallii/

Another New Zealand gem in this genus is Ranunculus pilifera. I don't know what the flowers look like, but the foliage is good enough as-is!

http://www.nzpcn.org.nz/flora_details.aspx?ID=656

 

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

Steve Newall
Steve Newall's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23

These pictures of Ranunculus pilifera were taken yesterday in the Eyre Mountains near Queenstown in New Zealand . These plants are under snow during the winter and most of the spring months . The summer temperatures are generally cool ( less than 75F) and there is usually a breeze around that often exceeds 60 mph . There are very few if any warm , humid days . Rain/snow occurs at anytime

The fine looking gentleman is well known forumist Dave Toole

Balclutha , New Zealand

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