Fritillaria

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Kelaidis
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Joined: 2010-02-03
Fritillaria

This has been the year of the Frit for me: I've been planting them for years and getting them from here and there, and finally most of them are blooming and I'm pleased as punch: here are three to kick things off: I got the pinardii and sibthorpiana from Jane McGary and the Fritillaria sewerzowii from Ellen Hornig: all are charming...

Trying to get some decent pix of the numerous chequered, dark gloomy ones. Hard!

Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

Love that last species Panayoti!  I saw that one last year in Jacques Thompson's coldhouse.

No frits even in bud yet but I'm happy to say persica will bloom this year after a hiatus last year.  If only imperialis would bloom...I get a bloom every 5 years or so...the clump is up to 12 stems now.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

The best Frit here is F. meleagris. It is one of the few plants the slugs let alone so it sows itself in humid places.
Here with lesser celandine. a weed here.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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First to open for me is michailovskyi

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Kelaidis
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Joined: 2010-02-03

Todd,
  Not to burst bubbles: what you have there is almost certainly Fritillaria uva-vulpis, which admittedly has a resemblance to michaelovskyi in being bicolored. But F. michaelovskyi has much bigger, more campanulate flowers with much brighter purple and broader yellow band. I think I have a picture or two to share...The first is the F. michaelovskyi, and the next two are F. gracilis and F. latakiensis (both thanks to the redoubtable Jane McGary): both have beautiful markings inside the bells: sure love them frits!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Quote:

numerous chequered, dark gloomy ones

Holy moly, PK, they're never gonna let you take their photo if you speak about them like that! :o
And be glad that this is not  Ian who is  reading you calling them "names", too  :o .... that could ruin his day!

Cheers,
m

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

I was thinking it was uva-vulpis, but the tag said michailovskyi...I bought it at a local nursery as the latter, not the former...darn those Holland bulb producers and their labeling!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Not to worry, Todd: I have no end of mysteries in my garden. And I know that a large proportion of the nursery sold plants are fictitiousloy named at best. Below I'm posting three more of the darkling frits that seem to like my garden. Fritillaria hermonis ssp. amana is far and away the most vigorous and most amazing fritillaria we grow: it LOVES Colorado, and makes huge clumps: at Denver Botanic Garden there are masses of it in Woodland Mosaic Garden--plants with dozens of flowers nearly a yard tall. Fritillaria assyriaca  is likewise one that really likes us, and grows in a variety of sites. My happiest clumps are in the blue gramma lawn alongside all the Zigadenus venenosus and Calochortus where this picture was taken. The last, narrow flowered thing came from Jane McGary (where so many of my best bulbs come from): I lost the label. Any guesses?

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Quote:

The last, narrow flowered thing came from Jane McGary (where so many of my best bulbs come from): I lost the label. Any guesses?

Looks like Fritillaria elwesii to me, PK.    (Maggi speaking, since Ian is still in shock about the "numerous chequered, dark gloomy ones" remark!!) ;D

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Kelaidis
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Joined: 2010-02-03

Do they sell smelling salts in Scotland? I must certainly send some along for poor Ian....hope he has recovered a bit!

We are experiencing the longest, loveliest spring in our history: even cherries are lasting for weeks in bloom it's been so cool.

How will I ever go back to our usual schizophrenic weather? No wonder you Scots grow things so well...although we have sun rather than rain. Cool sun. Very cool indeed!

I don't think we've had a hot day this year so far..ordinarily it would have seesawed up into the 80's repeatedly...making plants hasten. This way I've been able to really drink them in: aaaah!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Probably the last frit to bloom this year, this one in the Rock Alpine Garden: I have not had luck with F. camtchatensis, although i tried it many times. Always in a boggy spot or much competition...Trust Mike Kintgen, who cares for this garden now, to have found a perfect spot for it...now to find a similar spot in my home garden!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

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