Miscellaneous spring bulbs

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Spring Beauties (Claytonia virginica).

And a nice, heavily colored form.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

C. virginica seems to be a tidier plant than the coarse C. sibirica I have! (not blooming yet)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Much tidier than siberica indeed!  My siberica have now moved into the lawn!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Claytonia virginica disappears rather quickly as the season progresses, and is truly ephemeral.  Of the two sources of C. sibirica I grew from seed last year, yours, Todd, were the only ones that survived the winter.  Although, a few of those croaked too.  Even of the ones I held over in pots, Todd's were the only survivors.  I do see volunteer seedlings in the garden (and in pots) already.

My original Spring Beauties came accidentally with the root ball of a tulip tree I brought from a friend's place in Chicago.  Over the years, Claytonia virginica has jumped over a lawn section in favor of another bare piece of ground under a Sambucus nigra 'Laciniata', and has established there.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

C. virginica seems to tolerate much drier habitat than sibirica?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Hoy wrote:

C. virginica seems to tolerate much drier habitat than sibirica?

I would say so, since it disappears underground as a "dormant" bulb over the heat of the summer.  The Tulip tree is very tall and narrow, and lends little shade the the ground directly beneath. The soil gets very dry and warm.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

This Trit has been in bloom for a week or so, Triteleia grandiflora var. howellii, found in British Columbia and Washington State, Oregon, and California.  I tried in vain to get some goods pics, but finally got a few decent ones yesterday... I think it liked the 92 F heat (33 C), and there were still air moments, where these 24" (60 cm) wands could stand still for a few seconds.  The flowers are large and soft powder blue, never failing to bloom each year.

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=TRGRH

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Nice plants!
I have tried Triteleias here but they too soon disappear. Don't know why but maybe slugs. What else?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

Nice plants!
I have tried Triteleias here but they too soon disappear. Don't know why but maybe slugs. What else?

I haven't noticed slugs ever attacking mine, but then again, I don't have much of a problem with slugs, particularly in the open dry sunny areas.  I took a cue from how I'd see these plants growing in nature, often in heavy clay soil that gets sunbacked in summer.  My game plan, was to use our heavy rocky clay soil as a base, the soil (if you can call it that) broken up a bit from it's rock hard state, bulbs planted on top of that layer, then light sandy mix covering the bulbs. Grow in full sun; one exception is T. grandiflora howelllii that is growing under a Fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus), although it might as well be in full sun, the Chionanthus is among the latest trees to leaf out and is only breaking bud now.  I've had good luck with Trits over the past 10 years or so, using this technique, although it is very unlikely that they'll ever take over the garden.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

I haven't noticed slugs ever attacking mine, but then again, I don't have much of a problem with slugs, particularly in the open dry sunny areas.  I took a cue from how I'd see these plants growing in nature, often in heavy clay soil that gets sunbacked in summer.  My game plan, was to use our heavy rocky clay soil as a base, the soil (if you can call it that) broken up a bit from it's rock hard state, bulbs planted on top of that layer, then light sandy mix covering the bulbs. Grow in full sun; one exception is T. grandiflora howelllii that is growing under a Fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus), although it might as well be in full sun, the Chionanthus is among the latest trees to leaf out and is only breaking bud now.  I've had good luck with Trits over the past 10 years or so, using this technique, although it is very unlikely that they'll ever take over the garden.

Thanks for advice. I will try'em again and find clay and sand! And should they take over the garden I will not complain.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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