Hello from Canada's west coast

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Klapwijk
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25
Hello from Canada's west coast

Hello all,

I'm the guy who developed the NARGS Seed Exchange program for Laura Serowicz. As well, I'm the webmaster for the Alpine Garden Club of BC and the Fraser South Rhododendron Society.

With the incredibly mild weather we've had in the last couple of months, the list of plants in bloom is simply too long to detail here. Attached are a few pictures of where I live.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Chris wrote:

Hello all,

I'm the guy who developed the NARGS Seed Exchange program for Laura Serowicz. As well, I'm the webmaster for the Alpine Garden Club of BC www.agc-bc.ca/ and the Fraser South Rhododendron Society www.flounder.ca/FraserSouth/.

With the incredibly mild weather we've had in the last couple of months, the list of plants in bloom is simply too long to detail here. Attached are a few pictures of where I live.

Hello Chris, welcome to the NARGS Forum!  I'm nearly blinded by the all the color in your garden full of magnificent rhododendrons; you see sir, it is still mostly white here :o .  As a one time active member of the American Rhododendron Society, your garden photos conjure fond memories of unbelievably beautiful rhododendron gardens in the Puget Sound area of Washington State where I lived for 4 years.  Moving back to Northeastern USA, I could only dream of growing a small fraction of the rhodies that grace gardens in the Pacific Northwest.  I bookmarked Fraser South and look forward to scanning through The Yak newsletters... I like the pun :D

In addition to rhodies and azaleas, what other favorite plant groups interest you?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Klapwijk
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Hi Mark,

indeed, at certain times of the year our garden is a riot of colours.
I like most plants; growing amongst all those rhododendrons are trilliums, lilies, erythroniums, hostas, gentians, campanulas, fescues, juncus, gunneras, cortaderias, yuccas, adiantums, polysticums, aspleniums, trollius, viburnums, tricyrtis, thalictrums, sempervivums, sedums, saxifragas, rodgersias, primulas, pulmonarias, phlox, papavers, paeonias, lysimachias, meconopsis, cherries, apples, just to name a few, too many to mention them all here.

Chris Klapwijk, Surrey, BC, Canada

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Chris wrote:

Hi Mark,

indeed, at certain times of the year our garden is a riot of colours.
I like most plants; growing amongst all those rhododendrons are trilliums, lilies, erythroniums, hostas, gentians, campanulas, fescues, juncus, gunneras, cortaderias, yuccas, adiantums, polysticums, aspleniums, trollius, viburnums, tricyrtis, thalictrums, sempervivums, sedums, saxifragas, rodgersias, primulas, pulmonarias, phlox, papavers, paeonias, lysimachias, meconopsis, cherries, apples, just to name a few, too many to mention them all here.

Hello Chris!
Your inventory is impressive! I do try to grow some of the plants you mention but succeed not like you. Don't you have any problems? (Like slugs, Phytophthora etc?)
It seems as if I have got all the winter you lack. Do you want some snow back? What is the long climbing plant with blue(?) flowers?
I collect rhodos myself, have about 200 I think. Here is one grown from seed, hybrid with Rh sutchuense-blood. Should have started flowering soon, this is from last spring.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Klapwijk
Klapwijk's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Hi Trond,

slugs are a problem, no Phytophthora here, our soil is extremely well drained. Which is a good thing, the attached image of one of our paths, taken on the 15th of January this year, illustrates the substantial amount of rain we get here sometimes.

Thanks for the snow offer, we could have used it for the Olympics, although last year we had more than our fair share of snow with more than one meter accumulating in certain spots.

The vine is a Wisteria hybrid.

I can see the R. sutchuenense blood in your hybrid, very nice.

Chris Klapwijk, Surrey, BC, Canada

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Chris wrote:

Thanks for the snow offer, we could have used it for the Olympics, although last year we had more than our fair share of snow with more than one meter accumulating in certain spots.

The vine is a Wisteria hybrid.

Thanks, I suggested it had to be a Wisteria but I am used to see them on walls.
We had mild, wet  winter last year. Luckily the weather forecast for next week promise rain and milder weather, it has been extremely dry and cold here. I have a wet spot in my garden where I grow this one:

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Welcome Chris, and many thanks for your work with the seed ex!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Klapwijk
Klapwijk's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Hi Rick,

thanks for the welcome. It was a pleasure working with Laura on the Seed Exchange program, her computer literacy made my job a lot easier.

Chris Klapwijk, Surrey, BC, Canada

HughGmail
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-07-08

Hi Chris - thought I would find your here!  Welcome to the Forum.  Your pics only whet my appetite for the promises to come here in Colorado.  We finally have some indicators that Spring is on the way! 

Hugh Mac Millan
Former NARGS Web Master, Moderator
Eriogonum enthusiast
Zone 5+- - Front Range, Colorado (Denver area)

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Welcome Chris!  That is quite the garden you have!  Better than our Botanical garden!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Klapwijk
Klapwijk's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Thanks for the welcome, Hugh and Todd.

Running the risk of rubbing it in, some of our plants are a full month ahead of 'normal'. We had hellebores in bloom at Christmas, as were Viburnum xbodnantense and Jasminum nudiflorum. By the end of January Rhododendron ririei, R. dauricum, R. strigillosum, R. sutchuenense, Galanthus nivalis, Hamamalis mollis, Chimonanthus praecox, Corylopsis spicata, Pieris japonica, Chionodoxa lucillae, Iris reticulata, and some camellias were all in full bloom, enough already!

It's been an incredible winter, actually, it's one of those years where fall turned into spring, we had a little bit of snow early November and a few nights with the mercury dipping below freezing point, but that was it (for now, sure hope we don't get a late frost!)

Chris Klapwijk, Surrey, BC, Canada

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