More "Scoots".... err, "Scutes"?

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Here is a little guy from south eastern Nevada and south western Utah that likes it dry. Scutellaria sapphirina used to be considered as a variety of Scutellaria nana but currently has species designation.
(Seed will be available on the seed exchange.)

http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0903+0731
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SCSA6

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

It (S. sapphirina) travels. But unlike the fairly rampant (and also blue) S. brittonii and S. angustifolia, when it travels, it leaves its original home. So you think your little scutellaria you grew from Archibald seed is dead, and then, lo and behold, it's over there, and what you thought was bindweed was not.
S. pontica does not seem to be reliably perennial but it is, as Pk suggested, reliably ubiquitous. As is S. salviifolia. (100 free plants to the first person who comes over to dig them up. 200 free plants to ther second person.)
I still can't figure out why S. suffrutescens is called the "pink Texas skullcap". It's not from Texas. It's not really pink, either.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Judging from a couple photos taken in year 2000, I received some scoot-roots from Bob back in 1998, with fair warning they might take over my yard, or possibly the universe, Scutellaria sapphirina and S. angustifolia.  The former only lasted a couple years here, but S. angustifolia quickly escaped its home in a pot by ducking for cover and diving through the drainage holes.  It spread into an area that I use to hold potted plants, romping quietly through the top layer of bark mulch over hardpan subsoil.  Since its time above ground is brief, flowering late May or early June then retreating into dormancy, it has not caused much concern for its spread. In fact, it has only spread a couple meters in each direction, not nearly the threat something like Ajuga poses.  Thanks Bob, I'm always reminded of you when this little plant makes its appearance each spring.

Scutellaria angustifolia, in the first photo, the plant shamelessly making its escape from a pot:
 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Anonymous
Title: Guest

Here is the Eastern American version of a dryland Scutellaria.

http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/prairie/plantx/sm_skullcap.htm

I collected seed of S. leonardii this year.  I will be propagating it for ecological restoration.  I expect I will have plenty of seed in two years.  If I can spare any I will send some to the exchange.

James

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

James, good link for Scutellaria parvula missouriensis, I'm not as familiar with the many members of the genus in North America as I should be.  Never heard of Scutellaria leonardii either, nice markings on the flowers, there's seed and a couple photos on the Prairie Moon Nursery site:
http://www.prairiemoon.com/seeds/wildflowers-forbs/scutellaria-leonardii...

Update: I missed the fact that S. leonardii and S. parvula var. leonardii are synonyms of S. parvula var. missouriensis.
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SCPAM

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I wouldn't mind having Scutellaria angustifolia (or any other skullcap shown here) as a "weed"!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Well I've seen some quirky thread titles in my time but this one takes the biscuitlaugh

 

Here's my Scutellaria indica which my book tells me is a Japanese species.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

 

More "scoots".... err, "scutes"?

Yes, the crazy title (above) is a artifact of the switch to the new software... Hard to conceive of, but I guess it doesn't understand the quotation marks that were in the title!

I'll see if I can correct it. 

Great looking Scoot, errr.. Scut...  there!  I have a white form of Scutellaria indica var. parvifolia - I didn't realize it was from Japan.

Edit:  Yup, looks like I was able to correct the title!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I didn't notice any changes in the title? Or maybe I do not remember what it was??

Beautiful plant anyway!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

The first line in my last post shows the title, as it got translated into the new forum software.  Then I corrected it (finally!)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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