Armchair botanizing for Extreme Silene

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cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Hoy wrote:

I can't trust your (I mean the USDA) hardiness ratings at all! The winters here are Z8 (not the last 2 years - they have been more like Z7!) but the summers are not!

Yeah, an example of why Lori points out the limited value of those ratings--all they deal with is winter minimum, no consideration of moisture, when it comes, and summer temperatures... I believe someone somewhere (Alpine-L?) mentioned the origin of the system was for rating of tree hardiness in eastern North America..
I'd rather a plant description came with some details of the climatge in habitat (which are often hard to look up independently, especially for non-populated areas) but failing such a paragraph with every entry  ;D I'll still take a mention of the temp minimum!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

I'd rather a plant description came with some details of the climatge in habitat (which are often hard to look up independently, especially for non-populated areas) but failing such a paragraph with every entry  ;D I'll still take a mention of the temp minimum!

Agree! But you know, the winter hardiness depends on summer temperature(!) - at least the temperature in fall when the hardiness develops.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

Yeah, an example of why Lori points out the limited value of those ratings--all they deal with is winter minimum, no consideration of moisture, when it comes, and summer temperatures... I believe someone somewhere (Alpine-L?) mentioned the origin of the system was for rating of tree hardiness in eastern North America..

Errr, well, those are undoubtedly factors, but my actual point is that the minimum temperature tolerance is poorly understood for so many perennial species, yet these flawed zone ratings are bandied about and copied from source to source as though they have been tested and found to be infallible, when the exact opposite is true.  Zone ratings do much more "harm" than good in cold zones (don't you know that essentially all plants are "zone 6 to 9"?  :P) and actually prevent people from trying plants that they could otherwise be growing successfully.  (Ugghh, enough of beating that drum for the millionth time... I told you not to get me going on this!  ;D)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Hoy wrote:

cohan wrote:

I'd rather a plant description came with some details of the climatge in habitat (which are often hard to look up independently, especially for non-populated areas) but failing such a paragraph with every entry  ;D I'll still take a mention of the temp minimum!

Agree! But you know, the winter hardiness depends on summer temperature(!) - at least the temperature in fall when the hardiness develops.

I plan on growing various 'hardy' cacti, and with some of these, my summers will definitely be more of a factor (or at least as much of one!) than the winters--in this case, presumably they need the high temperatures to make enough strong growth to survive winter; fall hardening is likely an issue  as well.. I'll be aiming for a heat trapping planting for these, possibly with fall moisture covering...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Not such an "extreme" one, but nice enough to keep - Lychnis ajanensis:
   

It was grown from seed in 2008.  It is, apparently, endemic to Okhotsk-Kamchatkan Province of Russia (source: Wikipedia;  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circumboreal_Region)

The plant pictured above seems to match other photos of L. ajanensis that I was able to find, but here's where it gets confusing... 

I also have the following seed-grown plant labelled as L. ajacensis... though it has a rather different habit, and more nicely marked calyces:
 

???

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

It isn't easy to tell if they are the same, variable species or different species. But your plants certainly are different taxa!  . .  and both are handsome ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

Not such an "extreme" one, but nice enough to keep - Lychnis ajanensis:
It was grown from seed in 2008.  It is, apparently, endemic to Okhotsk-Kamchatkan Province of Russia (source: Wikipedia;   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circumboreal_Region)

???

Lori, both are nice, but they do look like different plants.  Here are some links from the same Plantarium Russia site, showing Lychnis ajanensis (syn: Silene ajanensis) from the Magadan Region (near the Sea of Okhotsk).  Your second one almost looks like Silene caroliniana.

Lychnis ajanensis (syn: Silene ajanensis), Magadan Region, Russia
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/81507.html
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/81504.html
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/view/item/23409.html

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A few more from the Plantarium Russia site:

Silene pygmaea, Dagestan
loose and airy, ascending stems, nodding red flowers.  I'd grow it if I had a chance ;-)
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/80166.html

Silene spergulifolia, Dagestan
charming species I'd grow in a heartbeat. Low bushy shrub-like growth, narrow thyme-like leaves, masses of white flowers and reddish calyxes.
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/76471.html
...masses of white flowers and red-veined calyxes:
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/77329.html
...this photo shows a prostrate form:
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/76449.html

Silene supina, Ukraine
interesting loose recumbent-stemmed plant, long conspicuous reddish calyxes, small cream flowers.
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/62110.html
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/62109.html
...some photos on this site show plants that look rather different:
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/22167.html
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/2940.html

Silene syreitschikowii, Crimea
similar to the preceding, low silver-leaf shrub like a lavender, racemes of creme olored blooms, usually with contrasting reddish calyxes.  Charming in some of the more dwarf forms.
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/63878.html
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/63874.html
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/63876.html
...greener, and more dwarf, thyme-like form:
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/63872.html

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

McDonough wrote:

Silene syreitschikowii, Crimea
similar to the preceding, low silver-leaf shrub like a lavender...

Is it actually a shrub, Mark (or just "shrub-like" in habit)?  Most unusual for a Silene, if so... but then who the heck knew there were so many fascinating ones in the world?!?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

All interesting, I think I like the last one most, esp if it is actually a shrub!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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