First '09/'10 success

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Broekhuis
Broekhuis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-18
First '09/'10 success

Well, I just had to pop in and report that the first seedlings from this year's exchange are starting to green up the place. Honor of first place this year goes to Scutellaria resinosa, which I've been wanting to grow for a few years now. So far so good - good germination, straightforward at room temperature.

What are you having success with from this year's round?

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

My winner was Trifolium alpinum, which germinated after about a week at room temperature, after scarification. 
Then (all at room temp): Vella lucentina, Ononis spinosa, Dianthus pinifolius ssp. serbicus, Dianthus petraeus ssp. noeanus, Limonium perplexum, Laserpitum siler, Lupinus lepidus utahensis (after scarification), Omphalodes kuzinskyanae,... and something new every day now!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Well, alright, maybe it is an addiction... but I can quit any time I want to...      :o

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Those were, by the way, packets of seed.  Everybody got that, right?  Oh well, never mind...   ::)

More (all room temp):
Senecio polyodon - I had S. polyodon ssp. polyodon, a South African species (from Gardens North), for many years, until it was eventually crowded out by other plants; I was never quite sure if it actually wintered over, or if it merely acted as a reliably self-seeding annual.
Scutellaria altissima - Rob, I have been very interested in scutellaria these last 2 seasons too (though I see that this one is not exactly a rock garden candidate!)
Sedum pilosum, Satureja montana illyrica (hardiness?), Teucrium hircanicum, Verbascum fontqueri and rotundifolium haenseleri, Delosperma alpinum (hardiness?), Lindelofia longiflora, Codonopsis grey-wilsonii and bhutanica, Campanula argyrotricha...

My winner of the "eager beaver" award goes to winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata) - sown on Feb. 21, with germination on Feb. 23... amazing.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

Scutellaria altissima - Rob, I have been very interested in scutellaria these last 2 seasons too (though I see that this one is not exactly a rock garden candidate!)
Sedum pilosum, Satureja montana illyrica (hardiness?), Teucrium hircanicum, Verbascum fontqueri and rotundifolium haenseleri, Delosperma alpinum (hardiness?), Lindelofia longiflora, Codonopsis grey-wilsonii and bhutanica, Campanula argyrotricha...
My winner of the "eager beaver" award goes to winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata) - sown on Feb. 21, with germination on Feb. 23... amazing.

Lori, since you like Scutellarias, I just posted in the Scutellaria topic on S. incana.  We have some similar tastes in plants, Satureja, Teucrium, Lindelofia.  I wonder which Lindelofia you grow, I once had a maroon red one from Turkey (actually, a Paracaryum).  Do you grow any Onosma?.  Regarding Krascheninnikovia lanata, I had never heard of it before, had to google it to find out what it is.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

So, resuming the original discussion... What is everyone growing from seed this year, and any germination success to report?

Since last time, I now have:
Campanula seraglio, Codonopsis bhutanica, Erigeron aureus (4 days to germ!), Incarvillea younghusbandii, Lysimachia lichiangensis, Napaea dioica, Salvia verbenacea, Scutellaria zhongdianensis, Townsendia minima, and Verbascum roripifolium (from my own plant but, as it is said to be a biennial, I suppose I'd best get some more going).

These are all easy, warm (i.e. room temperature) germinators (or I should say that I have gotten germination at room temperature without resorting to any other means).

Come on, folks - join in!  

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I am still waiting for my NARGS seeds.......
Have sown a few others. The first to germinate was Campanula aucheri in about a week. (I beheld this one in Turkey last summer and bought  seed this fall.)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Breathtaking!!  Your photo and the ones in Holubec's Caucasus book make this species look completely irresistible!
What are the yellow flowers intermixed with the campanula?  A gorgeous colour combination...

Today, I'm thrilled to report strong germination from Saussurea stella - planted on Feb. 24/10, germination on the 28th!  The seeds are from Pavelka, collected in 2008.  An exquisite species, as shown by the following photo from Magnar Aspaker's very interesting site:
http://www.magnar.aspaker.no/Saussurea%20stella%2009.jpg

Of course, I still have to grow it and winter it, but so far, so good on Step 1.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

Breathtaking!!  Your photo and the ones in Holubec's Caucasus book make this species look completely irresistable!
What are the yellow flowers intermixed with the campanula?  A gorgeous colour combination...

I am sorry but I don't know! I didn't make notes but I think I thought it was a Hypericum. Neither did I picture all plants I saw, we had to get down before the fog arrived.

Skulski wrote:

Today, I'm thrilled to report strong germination from Saussurea stella - planted on Feb. 24/10, germination on the 28th!  The seeds are from Pavelka, collected in 2008.  An exquisite species, as shown by the following photo from Magnar Aspaker's interesting site:
http://www.magnar.aspaker.no/Saussurea%20stella%2009.jpg

Of course, I still have to grow it and winter it, but so far, so good on Step 1.

I have met Magnar a couple of times but he lives 2000km north of here! He has a marvellous garden.  Mild winters with snow cover and lacking slugs and with midnight sun in summer he can grow almost all kind of alpines and a lot more.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

MSmith
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-12

I managed to get all my surplus seeds sown today. :) Now I look forward to seeing them grow.  It is my favourite pastime, checking for new seedlings popping up! It is like Xmas every time something new appears. Sometimes the ones you expect to be the most difficult appear with no problems, while the so called easy to grow ones just dont show! One never knows, it is so exciting! Many thanks to all the donors and of course all the people involved in the distribution.

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

I was WAY too overzealous this year...I have about 175 pots sown!  Mind you, I generally get only about 50% of the pots germinate the first year, but that still leaves 80-odd pots with seedlings that need thinning, repotting, etc.  It's a make-work project!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

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