Dryas octopetala

20 posts / 0 new
Last post
Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Dryas octopetala

Dryas octopetala is a very common and beautiful plant of alpine slopes in this area, and in addition, it has the delightful habit of repeated bloom through the season.
It can also be grown fairly easily in the garden here (last photo)... why I bother with my relatively feeble effort, though, when I see them in natural splendour throughout our mountain hikes, I don't know! ??? Anyway, it is another point in its favour, as if it needed one!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

I don't grow this one...mainly because it would take up too much room in the rockery!  I do have our native D. integrifolia which is at least slower growing.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Sellars
Sellars's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Lori:

We have the same issue with Dryas octopetala. It does not perform as well in our garden as in the mountains though some years are better than others with lots more flowers.  One of its endearing characteristics is that it roots easily from cuttings.  One day I will bring home a good specimen from the mountains and see if it does better than the garden variety.

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
www.mountainflora.ca
MountainFlora videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

D. octopetala (reinrose = rose of reindeer) is the only dryas in Norway (in the mountains on calcareous soil) but in the gardens it is the hybrid D x suendermannii which is commonly grown (I have this one). Have tried the real thing but it is not as easy as the hybrid but the flowers of octopetala is better.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Dryas octopetala commonly grows on exposed south-facing sites where the snow retreats early in the season. Later the flowering is more sporadic.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

I have the hybrid as well.  Drays drummondii is very rare in Newfoundland but D. integrifolia is quite common in limestone regions.  It is a smaller-sized version of D. octopetala.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

And speaking of repeated bloom through the season...
From the garden:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wild scenes with Dryas octopetala... ubiquitous and beautiful!
       

(I wonder if the first photo may actually be a hybrid with D. integrifolia?)

In the garden - an easy one to grow here:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Great plants and views, Lori! I see no reason to not grow beloved natives  in the garden- they can be seen more often and closely than in the wild!
Todd, we also have D integrifolia; at the  Columbia Icefields, I have see integrifolia, octopetala and  drummondii all growing together, I don't know if they cross..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I don't think my flowers ever get that big.  Quite easy to grow here in Minnesota, too,
although it is also easily crowded out by taller growing plants.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Beautiful, Lori! Both the plants and the landscape ;)
Although this species is rather common in the mountains here I have never tried wild collected specimens in the garden neither from seed. I have a plant of garden origin at my cabin though (probably D x sundermannii, a cross between D. drummondii and octopetala) as it never sets seed.

D. octopetala is an early bloomer so I rarely do see it in flower where I usually walk but last summer I was at Finse where the snow lingers till August or longer. But no pictures with both Dryas and view!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Pages

Log in or register to post comments