Can't beat P. vulgaris

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Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03
Can't beat P. vulgaris

Very well. It may have come to me as P. slavica. Or one of a dozen other names. Time and again I grow a pasqueflower and it mysteriously morphs into P. vulgaris. There was a time that this species had spread so thickly through Denver Botanic Gardens' Rock Alpine Garden I actually had a mandate from my boss to pull them out. And I removed hundreds...

Regretfully, since there are really not many alpines that provide so much punch so early. I particuarly like the forms that open widely like this one.

Is there a village in the Balkans where they manufacture new Pulsatillas that look just like vulgaris but with new names?"

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

It seems nearly every rock garden gets temporarily overun by P. vulgaris at first.  But it is a workhorse hard to be without.  This a nice red type.

P.S.  I somehow completely missed this thread, dated Feb 19, and since no one had any replies, I wonder if it is lost to others.  I always start with the page "Show unread posts since last visit."  Now going through many more threads at random, I find several, naye, many that I missed.  Is it just me?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

On the subject of seed accuracy, and Pulsatilla halleri ssp. slavica in particular,  I have read that halleri is supposed to emerge with flowers first.  How exacting is that?  Meaning absolutely no foliage present at all (like Pulsatilla patens)?

These pics are from seed from the NARGS seed ex, labeled as P. halleri ssp. slavica.  Is this what they are?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Beautiful plants.
I have no idea about your question... and I wish I knew where to find definitive descriptions of pulsatillas, also...
Here, though, from the SRGC site, is a photo record of the emergence and bloom of what is said to be Pulsatilla halleri ssp. slavica (and no one among a very knowledgeable bunch questioned the ID, so I assume it is correct!)  No leaves visible on that one... but I wonder if conditions may cause it to vary?
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=5093.150

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Thanks Lori.  Indeed I must have a hybrid with halleri, or plain vulgaris, or something. Whatever it is, it's not pure halleri.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

It seems nearly every rock garden gets temporarily overun by P. vulgaris at first.  But it is a workhorse hard to be without.  This a nice red type.

P.S.  I somehow completely missed this thread, dated Feb 19, and since no one had any replies, I wonder if it is lost to others.  I always start with the page "Show unread posts since last visit."  Now going through many more threads at random, I find several, naye, many that I missed.  Is it just me?

Rick, really like the your P. vulgaris 'Red Bells'.  I once grew a dwarf true red one that looks similar, its name was 'Red Cloak'.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Well, you could always try posting it at SRGC for ID confirmation, if no one comments here.  In Alpine Plants of Europe, J. Jermyn says of P. halleri, in general, that the foliage is "barely visible at flowering".  In it, there is a photo of ssp. halleri in flower that shows many leaves emerging.  There's also a photo of ssp. slavica in bloom, but the angle is such that one can't see whether any foliage has emerged.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Rick, in the dim and distant past Ian and I  presented a plant of Pulsatilla halleri slavica to the RHS Joint Rock Plant  Committee and the plant was awarded the premier award of  F.C.C. ... i.e. a First Class Certificate.
I cannot lay hands upon a digital photograph at the moment, though I'm looking at a lovely painting  of the plant by the late Lawrence Greenwood, a most accomplished watercolour artist...... and I can tell you that PK's plant is a dead ringer for it.... fabulous pale lilac/purple flowers which open very wide, giving a bloom about four to five inches across..... big boss of golden stamens with a cute lilac centrral "tuft"..... foliage absent or only just emerging at time of flowering. 
It's a gem..... it's not what your plants are, sorry!

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Four to five inches across...!?  Good heavens!  The plant in bloom posted by Ruweiss in the SRGC link I posted would then be, conservatively,  6 flowers across, so 24" to 30" across, minimum???

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Yup! Fully open, the flowers of a really good plant are huge.... it is the size of them, while still retaining their featherweight beauty that is so breath-taking..... just a truly gorgeous plant. :)

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

While I am not overjoyed that my plant is most likely P. vulgaris, I am certainly not sorry that it is definitively identified as not halleri.  And the flowers never open wider than in the pics I posted. Thanks everyone.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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