What do you see on your garden walks 2014?

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Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

Lori-Love that Jeffersonia! Ever since learning about it here in the forum, it has been on my want to grow list. I have tried it from seed once, but think the moist packed seed rotted in transit before arrival (from the last seed exchange). I haven't found it in any local nurseries either... will have to try again. 

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

You do show the neatest stuff, Claire.

 - - - - especially that Primula aureata!

I wondered about these Fritillaria meleagris, since they were a no show last year.  But they are back!

Taraxacum pseudoroseum and Mertensia alpina

                    

Corydalis nobilis

                    

Leibnitzia anandria volunteered in a pot of Phyteuma orbiculare seedlings

                    

Draba polytricha still in its original seeded pot from last season.

                    

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow, Claire!  The only "odd" seed that germinated here seems to be a moss rose... you've sure got a better class of weeds there.  ;-)   Fascinating plants, and it's neat to see the hybrids and variations popping up.

Gordon, here's an update on Jeffersonia dubia - I can send you seeds later on if you PM me with your address.

  

A seedling from last year of Pulsatilla ambigua/turczaninovii(?); last year's seedlings of Primula denticulata:

    

Pulsatilla halleri ssp. slavica 'Alba'... or so the seed packet claimed?  Hmmm, I'll have to pull out the new Pulsatilla book and compare; Primula allionii x auricula 'Aire Mist';

    

Corydalis solida; Pulsatilla halleri:

  

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Claire, your weeds are really remarkable! I have ordered Primula aureata seeds several times but nothing germinated. Maybe I should just have thrown them around!

Nomocharis is always eaten by snails and slugs and disappear quickly.

 

Rick, nice plants! Do the pink dandelion spread around? What's your Jeffersonia like now by the way?

 

Lori, that Jeffersonia dubia truly is amazing!

 

Just a few from my garden walk yesterday.

Not so many showy perennials now but the rhododendrons are in full flower. Here are two (can't remember the names as usual) near the house.

 

The dainty unknown Oxalis do better and better!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I remember how you "complained", Lori, that you Jeffersonia was never so spectacular,  but this year it has sure out done itself!

My nice multipetal form is still healthy, but still recovering (apparently).  Since it was so vigorous before, I am surprised at how slow it has been bouncing back.  I've been finding a lot of seedlings (from my other normal J. dubia) under my Salix ealeagnos shrub/tree.

The Taraxacum pseudoroseum hasn't flowered enough for me to let seeds just flit away in the breeze.  I've collected everything and given them away.  By the way, Trond, the Impatiens sp. seed you sent me all came up this spring, after I planted them last spring!

Iris lutescens 'Campbellii' and Uvularia grandiflora

                   

Deinanthe caerulea and Peltoboykinia watanabei

                    

Seed pods of Calycanthus floridus still linger, and Salix schraderiana is the very last willow to bloom (May 1), after all the others are done.  Well, I guess excluding the fall blooming species.

                   

Last fall I had culled a bunch of rejects from my lily hybridizing and the bulbs looked so yummy.  I had put them in a bucket in the garage to save and eat, and subsequently forgot about them.  They began sprouting in late winter, so I covered them with an inch or two of soil and grew them on for kicks.  I snipped off all the non-blooming sprouts and this is what they look like now:

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

What?  Me? Complain?  :-)     Yes, my Jeffersonia dubia has developed into a lovely plant.  I started moving seedlings around last year.

Chionodoxa and Iris reticulata; Tulipa tarda; Tulipa cv.; Tulipa urumiensis (or what is sold as it, anyway):

      

Trollius laxus; some Fritillaria meleagris not yet ravaged by lily beetles; Hacquetia epipactis:

      

Lathyrus vernus 'Gracilis'; Muscari latifolium:

  

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

Lori, your pictures are great.  I love seeing your plants -- your garden is so much later than mine, I get to enjoy the early spring plants all over again.smiley

I researched where I might have received the Primula aureata seeds.  I think they came from Betty Lowry, who ordered several kinds of primulas from the ACE expedition and also from various collectors of wild seeds.  All of her seeds, stored in the refrigerator, were ordered in 1994-1995.  I tried a few a couple of years ago, when this primula germinated.  Many that were sown in January of this year have also germinated.  I guess primula seed stays viable a lot longer than I expected.  And no, Trond, none of the primula seed was scattered around; it all went in carefully prepared and tended pots.

Does anyone know how to find the list of plants that were collected from the AGS China Expedition of 1994?  Several on Betty's list are "Primula sp." and I wonder if folks learned later what they actually were.

Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Brunnera 'Jack Frost'

                    

Another pic of Peltoboykinia watanabei, one week later.

Deinanthe caerulea and Dienanthe 'Blue Wonder'

                    

The Jeffersonia diphylla seeds you sent me, Mark: the seedlings are starting to show their non-rounded  leaf edges.

The lily on the left is a seedling hybrid of L. tsingtauense.  Below J. diphylla, normal foliage.

Syneilesis aconitifolia emerging.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

tropicalgirl251...
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-10-08

Beautiful plants Rick and Lori

Krish

Saskatoon,SK,Canada
Zone 3a
one of the sunniest cities in Canada.
Temperature range +30C to -38C.
average annual precipitation 347.2mm.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thank you, Claire!  I'm glad our long winters can at least help someone relive springtime... it's a magical season, indeed!  

I've posted your query about the plant list from the 1994 AGS China Expedition as  a separate topic, where I hope it will attract some attention.  I could also post it at the SRGC forum, if you wish (if you don't participate there yourself)?

Looking great there, Rick.  What a wonderful little forest of Syneilesis - looks like an invasive of trolls!   The foliage on your Peltoboykinia is beautiful.  The seeds you sent me germinated very well, but I think I lost the seedlings to my own lack of care, letting them dry out (doh!)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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