Alpines in April

24 posts / 0 new
Last post
Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thanks, Maggi!  I'll keep an eye on it.  The buds are continuing to develop on Synthyris platycarpa (a rich, dark purple now - but can't post any photos to the site this evening for some reason) - hopefully, S. dissecta blooms a little later?  The first Pulsatilla patens and Hepatica nobilis are blooming now.... now if only it would stop snowing! 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Maggi- it is exciting to simply see plants emerge after so many months, and more exciting yet to see recent plantings having survived :) I now have my first crocuses of the year flowering- photographed 2 on Wednesday, and I think several more opened on Thurs, but no chance for photos.. A couple of Drabas opening first tiny flowers too...

Not all good news though- one of my berms which had a number of Pulsatillas from seed starting to come along nicely seems to have been strongly occupied by voles during the long buried months, and most if not all of the Pulas seem to have been munched, along with Hieraciums and Geum coccineum... too soon to see what wil survive there- I think the species other than Pulsas may be okay, those seem likely to be largely toast- have to hope they re-seeded, as they were in flower last fall and I did not collect the seed. 

On the plus side, crocuses and Cory solida  in the same area seem to have been left alone, as were Cyclamen purpurascens... and in totally different beds, first ever for me buds on Pulsatilla vernalis and patens- both from Lori's seed years ago, they should have flowered years ago, probably, but it took a long time to get them planted out!

Lori- we got several hours of rain (less than originally forecast) out of the system tuesday night- wed ended up more sunny than not... no snow in the last few days, though more chances in the forecast!

 

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Hi Cohan,

I often think that as you guys are discovering what survived the winter (and those burrowing varmints!) we are finding what has come through the summer drought and might come into flower. Just re-potting (very late, I know) some bulbs to discover pots that had a dozen or more stems last year are now empty or just one corm and lots of empty husks! What happened? I thought I kept them protected from summer rain (not that we had much) or did some critter get in? frown

Oh well, more room for new seedlings!cheeky

cheers

fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I guess there are many reasons and occasions to lose plants...lol.. As far as disappearing bulbs, I have some of that experience indoors too...lol can't say I quite have th ehang of the SA wintergrowing bulbs yet- some I suspect I have not kept quite wet enough in growth, and then in dormancy, who knows-- too dry? not dry enough?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Snow on the ground again today (ugghh)... a return to spring is forecast for Tuesday.

Here's an update on Synthyris platycarpa; Saxifraga kusnezowiana:

   

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Two superb plants Lori. I had not been aware of Synthyris sp. until recently, when a friend asked if I could source some for him. He said they were wonderful plants, and now I can see why he is so keen, cool. Any cultural advice for him?

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Nice to see your gardens thaw, Lori and Cohan!

Synthyris is a favorite genus which I struggle to establish in my garden!

 

Here are my "alpine garden" at my montane cabin (950m absl). Pictures taken last week (18.4.).

Campanula aucheri. It has survived several years but does not bloom much - 2-3 flowers at most. Still almost a foot of snow in the meadow above the bank.

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

My "alpine roof" has never been snow covered this winter. Only a few days with sub zero temperatures this winter and the spring started at least a month earlier than last year. Saxifraga oppositifolia is done weeks ago and another sax is on last verse as are the eariest Primulas but the auriculas are coming now.

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Longma wrote:

I had not been aware of Synthyris sp. until recently, when a friend asked if I could source some for him. He said they were wonderful plants, and now I can see why he is so keen, cool. Any cultural advice for him?

Well, I'm afraid I don't have anything profound to say about it... I've only had Synthyris platycarpa since 2011 (one plant), and S. dissecta since 21013 (also one plant).  Having survived here at least this long, they seem to be very hardy plants that accommodate dry conditions. smiley  They get no particular care, planted outside in the tufa garden.

It snowed all day here yesterday,but dawned bright and clear so we are snow-free again (for a while?)   

A couple from today... Pulsatilla vernalis; Saxifraga oppositifolia with the flowers more open now.

  

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Thanks anyway Lori. One thing I can say with certainty is that they are very difficult to find here, and seed from the usual places seems to be restricted to one or two species, so maybe they are not that easy to grow for the majority of folk. frown

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Pages

Log in or register to post comments