Crocus 2014

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

They are pretty!

Do you know how they perform outside?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

You're really showing us some unique, rare, and very special Crocus sp. Tony. Cheers! Beautifully grown as always, cool

My thoughts ( for what they are worth ) Trond, are that to succeed in the outside in the garden Crocus x gotoburgensis will need a cool,  very free draining, perpetually moist site !!! Given its parents ( C. pelistericus and C. scardicus ) the skill seems to be providing an environment that is moist enough to satisfy the bulbs needs, while not been too wet to cause rot ( which I understand is the main cause of failure amongst potential growers). Many Some, maybe only a few, people do grow both parents ( usually C. pelistericus ) outside in their gardens though, so it is by no means too ( !!!! ) difficult. surprise

Edit - Strike "Many", to remove exaggeration, devil

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Ron an excellent description of the growing conditions however I have yet to meet anybody that does grow either  it or its parents outside. My conditions seem to suit them ideally 

here is a Crocus sieberi from Mt.  Parnassus in Greece.

 

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Thank you both.

Maybe I should  try it outside then, my climate is cool and moist and not very cold in winter either!

Although the plants you have shown Tony are well worth growing in pots and admiring on close range I can't have too many pots around.

 

That sieberi isn't bad either!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Longma
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Another stunning C. sieberi Tony. A unique specimen??

I'd be fascinated to know if your conditions suited C. pelistericus and C. scardicus ( and so maybe C x gotoburgensis ) Trond.indecision  I fear that your main problem may be getting hold of bulbs or seed in the first place!!. I'm sure that those that show the flowering adults on various websites have managed them for many years

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I looked up both species at the AGS site and according to the description there (cold winters with snow cover etc) the climate at my mountain cabin seems to suite them better! Here at home the winters are usually not cold except for a few days and we get a lot of rain too.

Anyway I'll look for seeds/corms!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Ron

I think it is a particularly fine one (they all are!!)  Nothing beats seeing them by the thousand in the wild though.

 

Trond 

I produce some seed of pelistericus each year and so you are welcome to some of it. i understand it is not possible to send corms to Norway.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I would love to have some seed, thank you!

I can bring home 3kg bulbs etc without soil from Europe when traveling so a few in a letter shouldn't be problematic. Live plants need a phytosanitary certificate though.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Longma
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Tony Willis wrote:

Nothing beats seeing them by the thousand in the wild though.

That must be an amazing experience Tony? When would you recommend the best time to see this, given the vagaries of the weather each year? Are they all identical to this on Mt. Parnassus or was this a special selection? C.sieberi is certainly a most beautiful Crocus sp. in all of its forms! smiley

 

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Ron

 

I always go the first two weeks in May which has been an ideal time for seeing a lot of different plants. naturally it means missing the early species but  timing is always a compromise.

The  Crocus sieberi on Parnassus are very variable as they are in all their sites. It is a very common plant on the higher mountains and occurs in large numbers when suited. A large area around the ski resort on Parnassus has now been bulldozed and turned into car parks during the economic boom. The area is now the site of many unfinished houses and other failed developments, unsightly,but this has had little effect on the plant populations which  cover many miles of mountainside.

Two pictures of small areas of hillside to illustrate how dense the plants can be. Both are on Kymachalana but the C. sieberi could have been taken in any locations.

  

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