Plants I should be growing

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Toole
Toole's picture
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Joined: 2010-07-02

I go there as well Lori, (PK's musing's).

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Mark,

I'm with Maggi - I want to grow too many plants! Like Kristl Walek (Gardens North) says - "so many species, so little time"!

More and more I realise that the plants that suit our conditions are the "Mediterranean" ones - plants that enjoy a cold,wet winter and a hot dry summer. Fortunately most of my favourite plants, especially bulbs fall into that category. The rest I have to try harder to keep going - usually in a shade house (if they aren't able to cope with the summer heat) or on a protected verandah (if they can't take the winter wet).

I'm particularly keen to try more plants from Turkey, like the acantholimons (I have one!), and some of the western Americans like Eriogonums. Thank heavens for Seedexes and people like Kristl who sell seeds from lots of different places. We have restrictions on what seeds/plants can be brought into Australia (which is important because we are relatively disease-free) and it's getting harder to get new plants added to the list of "allowed" imports. <sigh>

cheers

fermi

 

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Toole wrote:

I'm so glad you have started this topic Mark .Like you i 'wanted' this plant after seeing a pic somewhere of a plant with lovely red flowers and then reading about it in the NARGS publication 'Bulbs Of North America ' .

I managed to obtain seed back in 2006 which germinated easily enough and i understood the best chance of success was to grow it in a shaded position which I've done,(although i think last year Lori you mentioned finding it in the wild in open positions).

Well, not so much in "open positions" exactly, but my observation has been that when it occurs in sunnier glades in the forest (i.e. clearings, or where the trail is broad and some sun can shine in), the flowers tend to be more highly coloured. 

Hmmm, I kind of feel like I should mention how small the flowers are on Stenanthium occidentale - only about a centimeter long -   lest anyone feel betrayed later on, after going through all the trouble of finding seed, germinating it, growing these, waiting for a bloom, etc.!! 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here's another... Pediomelum subacaule.  It was brought to my attention via a sales e-mail from Sunshine Farms and Gardens (Barry Glick) in West Virginia in which its many virtues are extolled - looks wonderful!

http://www.cas.vanderbilt.edu/bioimages/biohires/p/hpesu5-wp022302-22e54...

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Visiting a garden center today to buy big pots for roses, I was delighted to find pots of "red birds in a tree", Scrophularia macrantha, claimed to be hardy to zone 4!  Of course, I bought a couple to see how they'll do.

http://www.botanicgardens.org/blog/neither-scruffy-nor-scrophulous-scrop...

(Hmm, the Denver Botanic Gardens article reminds me that I grew Scrophularia chrysantha a couple of years ago, and never saw hide nor hair of it the following spring.)

http://www.wnmu.edu/academic/nspages/gilaflora/scrophularia_macrantha.html

http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=SCMA7

http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?where-lifeform=any&rel-taxon...

 

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I did grow a nice but lanky red-orange flowered Scrophularia sambucifolia some years ago. Now it is gone - strangled by strong growing Geraniums. Scrophularia macrantha seems to be much better!

I have never tried S chrysantha although I did see it at 4000m altitude in Turkey. At that time I had never heard of any but the common weedy S nodosa (which I have in my garden) but I remember thinking that it was a gardenworthy plant!

Scrophularia chrysantha Mt Suphan, Turkey.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Lori S. wrote:

 

Toole wrote:

I'm so glad you have started this topic Mark .Like you i 'wanted' this plant after seeing a pic somewhere of a plant with lovely red flowers and then reading about it in the NARGS publication 'Bulbs Of North America ' .

I managed to obtain seed back in 2006 which germinated easily enough and i understood the best chance of success was to grow it in a shaded position which I've done,(although i think last year Lori you mentioned finding it in the wild in open positions).

Well, not so much in "open positions" exactly, but my observation has been that when it occurs in sunnier glades in the forest (i.e. clearings, or where the trail is broad and some sun can shine in), the flowers tend to be more highly coloured. 

Hmmm, I kind of feel like I should mention how small the flowers are on Stenanthium occidentale - only about a centimeter long -   lest anyone feel betrayed later on, after going through all the trouble of finding seed, germinating it, growing these, waiting for a bloom, etc.!! 

 

Well my mutterings earlier on in this Topic must have been heard ........surpriseas here's a shot or two of Stenanthium occidentale currently in bloom.As Lori mentioned the flowers are small,(a.k.a. tiny !).An individual bloom fully open with petals re-curved easily fits within the span of my little finger nail............laugh.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

Stenanthium occidentale is completely new to me, even though I lived in British Columbia within its range for over twenty years! I wonder what the fragrance is like?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/fsnorthernregion/8051436342/in/photostream/

Another brand new plant to me: Hebe benthamii,  is high on my list, though it is extremely doubtful I'll ever be able to find one to add to the garden, or ever be successful with it. It is native to some of New Zealand's subantarctic islands, the Auckland Islands, and Campbell Island, and isn't in the nursery trade at all as far as I can tell. There are very few photos of it on the web. I found the best ones on flickriver.com, but have been unable to link the photos to this post.

 

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

Longma
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

Exactly! The first link was the one I was trying to add to my post. What an amazing plant! Given its origin, I'd think it would be quite hardy in colder climates. The only Hebes in our garden at the moment are H odora (bought as H. buxifolia), and H. pinguifolia var. pagei. It would be great to source a few more cold hardy Hebes for the garden, in particular ones with more prominent flowers, or one of the "Whipcord" Hebes.

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

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