Panorama Ridge, Banff N.P., July 19, 2013

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Panorama Ridge, Banff N.P., July 19, 2013

We did one of our favourite hikes, Taylor Lake- Panorama Ridge in Banff N.P. on July 19th and had a splendid day in this beautiful and very floriferous area!

Starting just past Taylor Lake, here is the start of larch-filled valley... soon giving way to mountain vistas and blue tarns:

        

    

And wonderful flowers...  

Kalmia microphylla was common, dispersed in good number along the boggy lakeshore and streamside, and appearing most spectacular when growing up on a hummocks:

         

 

 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Splendid scenery, looks like a perfect day.  The shots of cute Kalmia had me looking through the genus, there is an eastern counterpart to K. microphylla, which is K. polifolia, although that species is found all the way to your area in Alberta as well.  Earlier taxonomy had microphylla as a variety of polifolia, the Flora of North America talks about how closely related these two are. A charming plant.

http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=250065673

 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Yes, a great day!  A couple of drizzles later on but wonderful nonetheless!  As we were on our way up, we saw fresh bear scat at the beginning of the trail, and at about the halfway point, were told by some folks coming down that they'd seen a couple of juvenile grizzlies at the lake that morning.  We kept a sharp eye out but saw no sign of them by the time we got up there.  (I guess I mention that because the word "drizzle" reminded me of "grizzle... y"... LOL!)

Flora of Alberta uses K. polifolia for the species that occurs in lowland bogs, and K. microphylla for the alpine species... or at least that was how it looked to the original author, or to the editing author in the mid-eighties, anyway.

Another interesting plant of the boggy lakeside areas, and quite common there, was Anemone richardsonii.  It's quite similar to Anemone parviflora, with its little ruff of leaves on the stem, though with yellow flowers.

     

I noticed one little Viola orbiculata:

Loads of Ranunculus pygmaeus in the wet areas:

    

A wonderful richness of plants and flowers, overall!

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Great spot- good that you are finding some good hikes in spite of flood damage.

Esp love the Kalmia and Anemone- so frustrating that seeds of these things are not commercially available- easier to get plants from Colorado or China than from Alberta!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Pedicularis contorta, in bud:

And vast expanses of Anemone occidentalis!

    

... some still in bloom higher up where the snow lingered longest:

    

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Saxifraga bronchialis:

The "heather" (actually Cassiope, along with Phyllodoce) was in full bloom - I don't think we've ever seen it so well:

    

This appears to be Cassiope tetragona, from the grooves at the back of the leaves:

  

Caribou moss (lichen) and willows; Dryas octopetala:

    

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

The Cassiope is a picture perfect little shrublet, have you been able to grow this?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

No, it's way too dry in my yard for Cassiope and Phyllodoce - I've killed enough of hte poor innocents in trying, LOL!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Castilleja:

        

  

Ranunculus eschscholtzii:

Pedicularis contorta:

Caltha leptosepala:

    

Mossy pond edge with Cassiope:

  

Claytonia lanceolata:

 

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Stream and meadow:

  

Pedicularis bracteosa; Rhododendron albiflorus; Veratrum viride ssp. eschscholtzii (x2);  ​and down near the trailhead, Cornus canadensis:

        

  

And ending with Icmadophila ericitorum or "fairy puke", possibly my favourite lichen!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Cool and interesting pics, Lori.  What is the red "fern" leaves to the front and left of Pedicularis contorta?  Another P. contorta?

Oh.  I see in your next post, it must be P. bractiosa....

 

 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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