Alpines in June

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I'll try to see if I can fix them.  I should have checked to see if they all enlarged as I guess they are supposed to... was pleased to see I could load that many at least!  Does seem as though I may have reached some sort of limit though.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here are the last ones, which were not enlargeable before, repeated with text... 

 

Lupinus aridus ssp. ashlandensis;  Saxifraga x burnatii (x2) - bought this spring from a local alpine grower:

               

   

First flowers on Anemone trullifolia v. linearis, bought last year from a local alpine gardener; Ajania tibetica;Hypericum aviculariifolium ssp. uniflorum... cute but not so spectacular as the first time they bloomed (monocarpically, unfortunately): 

 

             

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Mark McD wrote:

Fabulous stuff being shown here, I want to comment on each and every one. But little time tonight, but did want to mention to Lori, in your multiple image posting above, the one with more than 10 images, 5 of the images don't enlarge; not sure why, but maybe while there's no stated limit on number of "embedded images" one can upload, maybe there is a limit to how many will behave as thumbnails that will enlarge, I'm just guessing.

 

Fabulous stuff indeed Mark. A cornucopia of amazing images of some superbly grown plants.

It hasn't been mentioned anywhere as yet, to my knowledge, but this new forum appears to automatically resize any pictures uploaded, to fit within the limit. This for me is a tremendous innovation and removes one of my previous frustrations. Well done design team!

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Well, thank you!  I don't claim to grow anything well... I just stick it in the ground, and if the conditions happen to suit it, it survives (at the same time, a whole lot don't) - pretty haphazard. Thanks for the kind words though (however undeserved)!

A few more in this, the probable height of bloom in the rock garden:

Update on Silene falcata... the flowers are at their best on cloudy days, such as it was today:

Gentiana siphonantha buds are colouring up... a very rich dark blue that the camera doesn't quite capture:

A couple of Campanula that I failed to record properly; they look familiar - think I've grown them before - but if you know what they are, please let me know!

   

Aubrieta 'Axcent Blue with Eye" (uggh, the name makes me cringe!) and 'Royal Red':

  

Update on Oxytropis viscida(?); from seed last year; flowers turning an interesting blue:

A native alpine chickweed - not showy but I like the dark stems:

Campanula saxifraga:

Saxifraga cuneifolia:

Not exotic but I'm a sucker for red flowers... Anthyllis vulneraria 'Coccinea' is knocking itself out:

 

 

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

You certainly have many gems, Lori! I don't know which one I admire most ;-) 

BTW I think it worked to scroll down all your pictures by just clicking on the first when it was enlarged, then the next showed and so on.

We are on our way to help our daughter move so not many pictures now.

 

Here are Potentilla ambigua and Veronica austriaca from our cabin by the sea where we stayed one night.

  

 

Here are another Veronica, V. fruticans from our mountain cabin where we have spent 2 nights and one rainy day. (Going to Trondheim today.) Lychnis alpina (new name: Silene suecica) This year some albino forms have appeared.

     

 

Not exactly a plant for the rockery but worth a picture is Anemone narcissiflora.

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Potentilla ambigua looks very rock garden-worthy, and I love Lychnis alpina (used to have a big swath of them and must get some going again - I like the dark stems on that one too)!   Anemone narcissiflora is wonderful... is it a spreader?

Mostly just repeats today:  

Ajuga lupulina:

Incarvillea compacta:

Scutellaria indica var. parifolia 'Alba', bought this spring from Beaver Creek:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

A show winner that Incarvillea!

Lori, I can look for seeds later if you are interested. Potentilla ambigua seems to spread a little by underground runners so maybe not one to put anywhere.

Anemone narcissiflora has not spread by seed yet (with only one specimen in flower it scarily produces seed). It has slowly made a clump. Now I have planted another one so maybe I'll get a better harvest. 

A few plants from a short stop yesterday. Oxytropis lapponica, Astragalus alpinus, Astragalus frigidus (a stately plant but no open flowers yet), Pedicularis oederi. The last one doesn't quite fit in a rock garden but a bog garden!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Just received these delightful images from dear Anne Spiegel who is currently being snowed upon in Corvara, Italy on her (and Joe's) annual pilgrimage to the beautiful Dolomites.  A very late season and the current snowfalls mean that the high passes and usual haunts are out of reach, so Anne was especially pleased to discover these magnificent stands of Gentiana acaulis in a high meadow where she noted that every plant was growing in large clusters like this ... in old cow pats, perhaps?

Gentiana acaulis images captured by Anne Spiegel.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

 

Three more images from Anne Spiegel in the snowy Dolomites - this time of the gorgeous buttercup, Ranunculus seguieri.

 

Ranunculus seguieri - Images by Anne Spiegel

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Holy moly those gentians are out of this world!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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