Trillium 2013

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Very nice, Claire!

Did you hand pollinate?  Who was the pod parent?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Merlin
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-24

A few trilliums in the garden today, these two are the earliest to bloom here. I dont know what species they are(not a trillium guy)

Jim Hatchett, Eagle Idaho USA  Zone 5? 11" average annual precipitation

Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

Hi, Rick,

No, I did not hand pollinate nor did I sow the seeds.  These "volunteered" in the garden, which was the effect I hoped for.  Unfortunately, this bed is getting quite sunny and I'm going to have to move a lot of seedlings out (somewhere?) to grow them on and see if there are more hybrids.

Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

There might have been a discussion on this before...does anyone know if this T. erectum white form or something else?

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

Does it smell like wet dog or egg whites? If so, its erectum.

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

AmyO wrote:

There might have been a discussion on this before...does anyone know if this T. erectum white form or something else?

I posted this same question on facebook and the consensus agrees that it is T. simile.

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

In FNA the key separates sulcatum (which occurs in many colors) from simile by the recurved petals vs. not, or barely recurved. These are distinctly recurved which means it has to be a form of sulcatum, but just white. These are frequent in a few areas in the Ridge and Valley of Tennessee. Personally, having seen these, erectum, and simile in many populations in the field I don't see many consistent differences to separate them. In some populations you can find all three "species" in one population based on morphology and fragrance!

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

Afloden wrote:

In FNA the key separates sulcatum (which occurs in many colors) from simile by the recurved petals vs. not, or barely recurved. These are distinctly recurved which means it has to be a form of sulcatum, but just white. These are frequent in a few areas in the Ridge and Valley of Tennessee. Personally, having seen these, erectum, and simile in many populations in the field I don't see many consistent differences to separate them. In some populations you can find all three "species" in one population based on morphology and fragrance!

Thanks so much for that! It's good to now have the correct name.

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have now some nice batches of trillium seedlings (thanks to some forumists and others)! But I wonder, is it advisable to feed them well or not? And when is the best time and age to plant them out?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

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