White flowered Douglasia montana

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Brian_W
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-28
White flowered Douglasia montana

Greetings,

Douglasia montana is one of the most common plants in western Montana. It grows from the highest elevation, down to the valleys. Pretty much any rocky area will have numerous examples of this plant. Several years ago I found a small plant with white flowers. Last summer while collecting seed from this plant I found numerous seedlings that also had white flowers. Please see attached photos:

The main plant:

A small seedling:

The typical pink flowered form growing on a limestone cliff:

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Great to see these, and interesting to know it's that widespread. It xeems to be in calcareous rocks in habitat? Do you know if it's necessary to duplicate that in the garden?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I have Douglasia montana growing in non-calcarous conditions in a couple of troughs - doesn't seem to be overly fussy.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Brian_W
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-28

Greetings,

I find D. montana growing in limestone, shale, and granite based substrates.  A few months ago, I found some growing in clay soil in a very dry area.  They were growing among cacti and Eriogonum ovalifolium. 

Brian

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Both the white and the pink forms are beautiful! Seems this species has a wide ecological amplitude so it shouldn't be too difficult in the garden?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

It's always fun to spot color variants in a wild population. I'm glad you were able to collect seed. I often have a difficult time relocating a specific plant later in the season unless I mark the spot. I stack small rock cairns or circle the plant with a ring of stone as a marker and that seems to work most of the time.
Do you use GPS coordinates to relocate them?

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Brian_W
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-28

Hoy,

You should try the plant.  I send seed to England every season and they have good luck with it. 

John,

I use GPS and rocks or a stick to mark the spot. 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Brian_W wrote:

Hoy,

You should try the plant.  I send seed to England every season and they have good luck with it. 

John,

I use GPS and rocks or a stick to mark the spot. 

I would love to try it if I get the chance!

If I want to remember exactly where a plant grows I do take a couple of pictures, one closeup and one at a distance ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Good to know it's adaptable, now to watch for seed :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Do they grow in the Bearstooth of Bighorns?  If so, I didn't see them there last July.  It is one of the plants I'd love to see in the wild.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

. . . . and in the garden ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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