Indoor Gardens

43 posts / 0 new
Last post
cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Thanks, Trond. It sounds silly, but right now I can't remember for sure if it is ever completely leafless for me! I think I keep it mostly dry in mid-summer, but since it is so small I still give a little water now and then. I think by late summer the leaves are probably dry and then I water more regularly again from early fall and it makes new leaves. Because my summer is not that hot ,and maybe more importantly, nights are never hot, my winter growers are mostly only dormant a short time from mid to late summer- in spring/fall when light is best and I water both winter and summer growers the most on my windowsills and shelves, it can get quite hot inside the glass, especially in the main room where there is a curtain between the plants and the rest of the room, so light and heat are somewhat trapped in there, but nights are fairly cool all year (especially once we no longer have a fire!)..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Yes, I see ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

While waiting for spring warmth outside I can enjoy some plants inside. Here are Tulbaghia simmleri and Clivia miniata. The Tulbaghia has a pleasant scent. Last spring I had the pot outside from March on!
Although the Clivia is quite common I like the colour.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I grew Tulbaghia simmleri for a number of years, great house plant, and as you say, sweetly perfumed blooms (like many Tulbaghia species).  Although, cut off a leaf or stem, and it emits a strong fetid skunky smell (again, like many Tulbaghia do).

I'm terrible with houseplants, always forgetting to water them, but I have several Clivia plants (hybrids) given to me about 5 years ago. They've grown well and thrive in spite of general neglect, although no flowers yet. They were very small plants when I got them, should be large enough to flower now; still waiting.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

I grew Tulbaghia simmleri for a number of years, great house plant, and as you say, sweetly perfumed blooms (like many Tulbaghia species).  Although, cut off a leaf or stem, and it emits a strong fetid skunky smell (again, like many Tulbaghia do).

I'm terrible with houseplants, always forgetting to water them, but I have several Clivia plants (hybrids) given to me about 5 years ago. They've grown well and thrive in spite of general neglect, although no flowers yet. They were very small plants when I got them, should be large enough to flower now; still waiting.

It was you who told me the name of the Tulbaghia, Mark ;) And it is very easy as a houseplant during the winter. I do not water mine at all!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Looking good Trond! This is a key time for indoor plants here- still a long time before anything will be happening outside..
Mark- I'm no Clivia expert, but they may be needing some kind of seasonality to flower..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Yes, you have to give it a cool rest sometimes!

I move my Clivias outside to a shady place under a tree during the summer where they don't get more water than they get from the sky. In fall, before it is getting too cold I move them inside to a conservatory  and continue watering till December. During the winter the temperature can drop to 0C. I don't start watering till I see buds develop and the scape has elongated about 1ft, usually in March. When the buds show colour I bring the pot into our sitting room to enjoy the flowers ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

Just as we were getting used to no snow, the skies opened and dumped a blanket on us! I hope to have Trond's luck with a Clivia, though mine is just a small pup we bought last year (time to wait!). A few things have come through to give us a brush of colour.

Colmanara Wildcat is a complex hybrid of three genera (Miltonia, Odontoglossum, and Oncidium), though in the case of Wildcat, the taxonomists may have reclassified the Miltonia species used as an Oncidium. Some sources now call these variable plants "Odontocidium Wildcat". The plant was a Home Depot rescue, so I have no idea of the clonal name, but it blooms regularly at least once or twice per year, and the flowers last for over a month.

Streptocarpus 'Purple Panda' took much of the winter off, but is now blooming like mad! It is potted in an African Violet pot (pot within a pot, the external one a reservoir of water, the internal one made of porous clay with no holes for drainage) so the plant's roots pull moisture through the wall of the pot. It seems to thrive in these conditions, but to be honest- it needs a bigger home!

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Looking good, Gordon- great to have some colour inside when it's lacking outside- that's most of the year for me  ;D

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Sinningia leucotricha in the 2.5 inch pot:

           

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Pages

Log in or register to post comments