Corydalis

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ncole
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03
Corydalis

I am trying to figure out what the difference is between Corydalis ochroleuca and the WHITE form of C. lutea. I think I am correct in thinking they are two different plants. Someone gave me this white Corydalis which does acts like the lutea in its' reseeding habit.

ErnieC123
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-02

Hey Nancy !
I can't help you at moment about the difference of the two white Corydalis!
I can only send you a picture of my Corydalis ochroleuca, maybe it helps you.


Is it similar to yours?

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

It is normal for C. ochroleuca to be white with green and yellow, as in Ernie's pic.  I have never seen a white C. lutea, but it would be my guess that it would only be white?

Corydalis ochroleuca

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

C lutea is much hardier! And it has a different growth habit although it is difficult to explain. It is easier when you see both plants together.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

ncole
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Thanks.  I have tried posting a picture but to no avail.  Mine has a little yellow (thing) hanging out of its' white flower and otherwise looks just like lutea.  It seems every bit a hardy as the lutea.  Someone said you can tell the difference with seeds..(one being much shiner thant the other).  ??

I live in Baltimore, Md. zone7 and have a woodland garden....for over 30 years...so I am old.

ncole
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

;D

I live in Baltimore, Md. zone7 and have a woodland garden....for over 30 years...so I am old.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Nancy, from searching the internet, I can't find any references to a white-flowered form of Corydalis lutea occurring, but your plant certainly looks exactly like C. ochroleuca

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

ncole
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

I just now found a site that referred to a Corydalis lutea 'Alba' but do not know whether this is right or wrong.  I remember having ochroleuca awhile back and it seemed to just not like it in my garden.. this one reseeds all over.  Go figure.  Thanks Lori.

I live in Baltimore, Md. zone7 and have a woodland garden....for over 30 years...so I am old.

ncole
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

http://www.armitageimages.net/index.cfm?fuseaction=stock.detail&itemID=1...   I am assuming this is what I have now.. Many thanks

I live in Baltimore, Md. zone7 and have a woodland garden....for over 30 years...so I am old.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Ooops, I clearly didn't look hard enough! 
It's often difficult to find actual descriptions of European plants for some reason... if descriptions could be found, then one could figure out the defining differences between C. ochroleuca and C. lutea ('Alba').

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Many (if not most) of us have experienced the same phenomenon as you may have, Nancy: where we have trouble establishing a species in the garden, but once we do, it is never a problem again.  So I wouldn't necessarily believe that such a difference means a different species, although it could.

I see your suspect corydalis also has green in the flowers, just like C. ochroleuca.  But I have never seen any green in C. lutea flowers.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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