Wood anemone and its relatives

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

ErnieC123 wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Very nice Ernie! Especially the trifoliata! I have been looking for the real thing with entire (but serrated) leaves like yours for some time.

Does anybody grow Anemone oregana or A. quinquefolia?

I don't know Anemone oregana or A.quinquefolia, but i can ask some plantman if they have it. But : How can i send it to you if available???
I tell you in a few weeks (if i don't forget) if somebody can send it to me!!!

Ernie, it is possible to send as "bulbs" when they have gone dormant. Shouldn't be too difficult from Germany. I'll PM you.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

This thread hasn't had anything on it for a long time so I thought I would post these few pictures of Anemone nemorosa from The Blean, a large area of ancient woodland near to Canterbury in Kent, not far from where we live. Ancient doesn't mean entirely natural but with a long history of use and management - over at least 400 years - in the case of The Blean for well over a thousand. The result is wonderful stands of the anemone which are regarded as good indicators of really old, relatively undisturbed woodland. Hardly any variation in colour and mostly mixed with bluebells which are a real feature of Kentish woodland and coppice.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Not to belittle the herbaceous flora (they are quite nice!), but what are the two closest large trees in the first photo?

They seem to have a very distinct branch structure.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Maybe the branches of the trees have been cut when young. (We call it "styving" in N., not quite the same as coppicing as you don't cut to the ground)

Could the trees be linden or elm?

Anyway the wood looks quite nice! Would love to take a walk theresmiley

The spring down there seems a little bit more advanced than here although the wood anemones do flower here too!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Most of the bigger and older trees are oaks but there are not the really old specimens you see in some woodlands. Quite often when coppice is cut a few larger trees (particularly oak) are left amongst them. There is quite a mix of trees in different parts of the woodland, but the soil is mostly quite heavy acid clay so there are few like beech or yew or pine which grow on lighter soils.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The spring is definitely here and almost the summer too. With temps above 20C for several days the birches and other trees have already leafed out a couple of weeks before normal. The wind flowers are doing good although the slugs and snails take their toll. Here are some flowering now:

Seems I have to wait with the pictures. The insert button doesn't work!

Here is one of the blue ones (Anemone nemorosa seedlings) while waiting. . . . . .