Arisaema 2012

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I also have some plants that do not set seeds. However I just read that Arisaema is unique in changing sex during their lifetime. They starts as males and later changes to females but can continue changing. I know shrimps do the same, start as males and change to females at the age of 5!

Maybe that's why some plants don't set seeds.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Arisaema dracontium:

USA native.  Does well for me in full sun.  The slugs like it. 

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Arisaema consanguineum:

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

bulborum
bulborum's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Here Arisaema candidissimum starts flowering
grown from seeds , it took 4 years

Roland

Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/518187888211511
Normal Zone <8   -7°C _ -12°C      10 F to +20 F
RGB or RBGG means: Roland and Gemma de Boer

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hello Arisaema fans, I'm intrigued by all Arisaema, and all those that have been posted here are great to see and learn about. I have taken many photos during the 2012 year with intent of posting the photos, but available time proved too much of a challenge.  I hope to catch up over the fall and winter months.  But here's a timely one, the "fruit cones" on a rather remarkable hybrid (Arisaema triphyllum x tashiroi), a large robust plant with huge triphyllum-like leaves, but with a taller stem and the unique snake-like striped leaf-sheathes on the stem. I have recently harvested the "berries", sowing half of them, giving the other half to a friend and superb grower Marsha Russell.

The fruits were very squishy, just touch them and they popped with juice and spit out a few seeds.  My friend Marsha tells me that A. triphyllum has but one seed per "berry", whereas this one has up to 6 seeds per berry.  One can clean the seed, but be forwarned, you may want to wear gloves, as the berries seem to have an astringent that can lead to blistering or skin-layer shedding.  Personally, I prefer to sow whole-berry, scratched into the soil near the mother plant, and always gets lots of seedlings. In the photos below, this year I sowed a couple flats using whole berries, they should germinate in spring just fine.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

My plants usually don't set berries or if they do the berries quickly disappear :-\  I am sorry I have never seen seedlings in my garden either :( as any increase in my Arisaema population would be most welcome!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

Gene,

That should be A. heterophyllum? Dracontium has the inflorescence below the leaves. I have many of them from several parts of the range, but no see whatsoever this year on Arisaema. Too much rain all spring.

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

McDonough wrote:

In the photos below, this year I sowed a couple flats using whole berries, they should germinate in spring just fine.

Hello Mark

'berry' informative pics --sorry about the pun ---i just couldn't help myself  ;D ;D
I'm intrigued by your 'flats'---they seem quite shallow or is it just the angle of the photo ?.

While most of the Arisaemas here are just breaking the surface in pots, troughs and the garden proper, this one is up and in full flower--grown from seed but label long gone --hopefully i'm correct in keying it out as A.amurense.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hi Dave, the peat flats are normal depth (several inches), it's just the angle of the photograph giving an illusion of being shallow.  The blue styrofoam flats are actually repurposed flats, more shallow than the peat flats, these are from packages of mushrooms that I buy from the grocery store, I poke drainage holes through the bottom with a pencil, they make pretty good flats for seed germination, and maybe will last longer than the peat flats which decompose in a year or so.

I agree with your ID of Arisaema amurense.  :)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Afloden wrote:

Gene,

That should be A. heterophyllum? Dracontium has the inflorescence below the leaves. I have many of them from several parts of the range, but no see whatsoever this year on Arisaema. Too much rain all spring.

After some googling, I think you are right.  The leaf form is very similar on the two species.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

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