Yucca glauca

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04
Yucca glauca

The hardiest of the hardy Yuccas and the most wide spread.

I grew up seeing Y. Glauca on the short grass prairies of North and South Dakota. Most of the time the flowers are white blushed with pink. I have never come across any with darker pink flowers. Years ago I was reading in Claude A. Barr's 'Jewels of the Plains' that he was searching for some.(Is my poor memory correct?)
If so are any of the descendants of his selections around?

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

If so are any of the descendants of his selections around? 

That would be a resounding No. Except for Aster 'Dream of Beauty' and some cactus, everything is gone, though I like to think that there are gardens somewhere, where his selections are growing, unlabeled and forgotten.
As you're probably aware, most gardeners in this region want their gardens to look like eastern gardens, with daylilies and hostas and roses.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

What a fine flowering plant that is in John's garden! Yuccas grow well here but we just don't have the right setting for them, although maybe more gardeners might create mini-deserts in their gardens - there are a few parts of the south-east where rainfall drops below 20" annually, and gardens like Beth Chatto's with almost pure sand and gravel as a substrate.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Nold wrote:

That would be a resounding No.
As you're probably aware, most gardeners in this region want their gardens to look like eastern gardens, with daylilies and hostas and roses.
Bob

Bob
I figured as much. :-[
Same out here in the far west. Oh and for goodness sake don't forget to keep your blue grass lawn green. But things are slow to change, all I can do is show off my little slice of heaven to whoever is interested! ;)

Aaron
That is a grand old Yucca! I'll bet it demands respect when you encroach on it's personal space. :)

Tim
Thank you.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Weiser wrote:

Aaron
That is a grand old Yucca! I'll bet it demands respect when you encroach on it's personal space. :)

Just about 16-17 years old, one of the first yuccas I plantyed here. :)

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Your slice of heaven looks very nice.

Quote:

Same out here in the far west. Oh and for goodness sake don't forget to keep your blue grass lawn green. 

There are reasons for this. When xeriscape was first introduced, the idea (at least as presented at DBG) was a plant-for-plant replacement of water-loving plants with native dryland plants.
It has evolved into something quite different.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Why do we ever strive to get a garden at all with plants not naturally belonging to the landscape ;D
For example, why should I want to grow Yuccas in my garden - creating a lot of work and trouble for myself! It is unbelievable - but very fun ;D ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Hoy wrote:

Why do we ever strive to get a garden at all with plants not naturally belonging to the landscape ;D
For example, why should I want to grow Yuccas in my garden - creating a lot of work and trouble for myself! It is unbelievable - but very fun ;D ;D

Because we are eternal optimists. ;D

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

mkyoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-04-11

I enjoyed reading Barr's description of his search for colorful forms of Yucca glauca. I concur with John that most individuals are cream, sometimes with a blush of pink. Yet some redder ones are still evident e.g., this individual in a roadcut along Highway 14 above Sheridan, Wyoming. One problem in developing good color forms, at least from seed, is that it requires the patience of Job. Eight years ago I germinated a nice batch, and I am still waiting for the first flowering stem from the several survivors.

zone 4a/5a, Missoula, Montana

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Michael
That is a very nice form. The best I've seen and I've seen quite a few! Maybe you'll get blossoms on your's this year. Got my fingers crossed that they bloom and that you get a pink one.  :D

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

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