Using herbicides in the garden

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Anonymous
Title: Guest

Weed Pullers,

    Today I pulled dandelions.  I was surprised to see that I had pulled most of them before.  Now that I was looking for resprouting, it was quite obvious.  I had been pulling the same dandelions over and over again.
    I had been warned by Lori and Maggi that I needed to get most, if not all, of the root removed.  I used my fishtail weeder, but was only able to get about three inches of root removed despite my best effort.  I looked on line for different tools and found most of them would not be much of an improvement.  The only tool that looked really promising was the Shark Spade.

 http://www.sharkspade.dk/

    However, this tool costs over $80 to get in the U.S.  If you guys have any better ideas I am open to them.  

Thanks,

James

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Dandelions are easier to pull in spring and by waning moon! Use an old curved chisel.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Well, the guy has one thing right: the trick is to loosen the soil around the root.  I use a long flat head screwdriver.  Customers at Home Depot really like the commercially sold Weed Hound,especially because you don't have to bend over.    :rolleyes:

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

My daughter liked the 'rodent threatener'; she is mad keen on all things Japanese!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

she is mad keen on all things Japanese! 

Sushi, too? Yum.
I love using the nejiri weeder. The blade can be kept very sharp. Apparently, several centuries ago these things were popular with ninja, since, if caught, they could rightly claim that the nejiri and kana were simply gardening tools.

Believe it or not, the use of herbicides and pesticides in the garden is one of (actually many) things on which I have no opinion.

I was surprised to read in an old AGS bulletin that "liquid pesticides should be flushed down the WC". I imagine attitudes have changed since then.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Anonymous
Title: Guest

Bob,

    Pesticides are one thing I do not use in my garden.  I main reason I garden is because of all the interesting insects my plants attract.

James

Anonymous
Title: Guest

Here is an even better example.  I saw this Grape Vine Beetle while picking Japanese Beetles off a Virginia Creeper.  I flick the Japanese Beetles into a cup of soap water to get rid of them.  This Grape Vine Beetle was an exciting find for me.  If I had just sprayed to kill the Japanese Beetles I would have killed this cool Grape Vine Beetle also.  This thing is huge.  It was 1 1/4 inches.

James

Schier
Schier's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-02-16

Ha ha, the rodent threatener - my son has a set of three katana, he'd probably take after me if I snuck one out - he has collected some knives and "swords" and I know he keeps them well polished, etc. He has given me an old machete though, it works like a charm at whipping off a lot of unwanted vegetation, eg. thistles ( thistles are another story altogether )
For dandelions, yup, loosen them up and pull - I do get quite a feeling of satisfaction when I feel it coming up with the whole root.  I have a very, very  large farmyard though, and so much area, that there are countless dandelions that need not have any fear of me coming round.  If  I had 48 hours in a day, I might have a chance of getting them all!

Faith S.   Gardening in central Alberta climate, from min. -44 c to max. 36+ C. ( not often! ) Avg. annual precip. ~ 48 cm  Altitude ~ 820 m. Have "frying pan gardens" up around the house, and also some woodland areas down the pa

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

If  I had 48 hours in a day, I might have a chance of getting them all!   

That'd make for quite a boring day.

You could pretend that you were growing them for consumption. Though, I bought some pissenlits for a stir fry once, and, well, sorry, not for me.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Incidentally, I am very fond of my machete. Genuine Brazilian one. My late spouse was adamantly against me buying one, claiming that no one who grew androsaces could possibly find a use for a machete, but when she saw how easily it cuts small branches off the larger branches that are constantly being broken off the trees and shrubs here, she changed her mind.
Very soft steel, but still effective.
Good rodent threatener, too.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

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