Hypericum anagalloides

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04
Hypericum anagalloides

Hypericum anagalloides is a herbaceous mat forming ground cover, for a damp bog/fen sights. The dense bright green foliage is set off by golden yellow blossoms. This 1/2 inch tall gem is quite common across western North America. It's common name is "Tinker's Penny".
It is easily transplanted.

Hypericum anagalloides and Mimulus primuloides

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

John, a cool little plant, as a die-hard Hypericum fan I'm embarrassed to admit I didn't know this groundcover species... I've been focusing in on the highly ornamental woody North American species (like H. frondosum and prolificum).  I see that it has a widespread north-south distribution in western USA.  In the 4 years that I lived in Washington State, I'm surprised that I did not encounter this plant.
http://plants.usda.gov/java/nameSearch?mode=sciname&keywordquery=Hyperic...

CalPhotos gallery link:
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=photos_index&where...

John, can I assume you grow this plant based on the comment "it is easily transplanted".  Any further comments on growing this prostrate species.  How does it rate as a "spreader"... safe or something to keep an eye on?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Anonymous
Title: Guest

Mark,  Here are some other interesting Hypericums.

Hypericum kalmianum - found in the Great Lakes Region in calcareous flats
Hypericum pyramidatum - found where fens grade into shrub thickets
Hypericum crux-andreae - This one does not grow in my area.  I saw it once in the New Jersey Pine Barrens.  It is the only member of the Rosaceae I know of that has four petals.

James

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Hypericum crux-andreae...
Had anyone told me that it had only four petals, I wouldn't have believed them.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Hypericum crux-andreae...
Had anyone told me that it had only four petals, I wouldn't have believed them.

Researching on these more, there are several North American species with the 4-petal arrangement.  I didn't recognize the name H. crux-andreae, but looking it up I realized I was familiar with it under an earlier name, Hypericum stans.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

James wrote:

Mark,  Here are some other interesting Hypericums.

Hypericum kalmianum - found in the Great Lakes Region in calcareous flats
Hypericum pyramidatum - found where fens grade into shrub thickets
Hypericum crux-andreae - This one does not grow in my area.  I saw it once in the New Jersey Pine Barrens.  It is the only member of the Rosaceae I know of that has four petals.

James

Thanks James, I've seen both H. kalmianum and pyramidatum in a garden in New Hampshire not far from me, some of the woody shrub Hypericum have very attractive peeling reddish bark too, really interesting plants, and valuable for mid summer bloom.  I've grown a couple southeastern species that are superb rock-garden sized low matting shrubs, H. lloydii (needle-like leaves) and H. buckleyi.  The latter I had in a former rock garden for years, whereas H. loydii is hard to establish this far north... I first admired it in the Boston garden of We-Du nursery guys Dick Weaver and Rene Duvall.  H. reductum is another heath-like low shrubby species; isuch a fascinating genus. 

In the topic entitled "Shrubby Hypericum - starting with H. frondosum", it was my intent to expand on the subject there, but you know how best intentions go, one gets busy, and then....
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=621.0

I do have some good photos of H. prolificum, a really terrific shrubby species, which I will post on at the topic-link given above.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

McDonough wrote:

John, can I assume you grow this plant based on the comment "it is easily transplanted".  Any further comments on growing this prostrate species.  How does it rate as a "spreader"... safe or something to keep an eye on?

Mark I do grow it in a bed for fen plants. I don't find it weedy, it spreads moderately an inch or two a year forming a nice shallow rooted, sheet of foliage. It's stems are tender, and succulant like.   through the years it's mats build up on the humus debris of previous seasons, forming little green mounds. It grows in full sun were there is a continuous source of surface moisture. (e.g.  seeps, springs and stream banks).
It is a great filler plant and is lose enough to allow other species to sprout in to the mats. (e.g. Mimulus,  Pedicularis or Platanthera ect.)

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

What a treasure! Never  heard of or read about it before. Do you know if it is easy from seed?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Hoy wrote:

What a treasure! Never  heard of or read about it before. Do you know if it is easy from seed?

I don't know. I took a rooted cutting.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

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