Thalictrum 2011

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Thalictrum 2011

There are so many garden-worthy Thalictrum that they probably deserve a thread of their own.

Here is one of last year's additions to the garden, Thalictrum ichangense 'Evening Star'. (I see that it is sometimes referred to as 'Evening Star Strain', which seems sensible, seeing the considerable variation between the two plants I bought.)

ncole
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

I just got one this year.  Someone stepped on it at the Easter egg hunt and I thougt it was a goner, but then all of a sudden it came right back.  I think it is quite different from my other ones.

I live in Baltimore, Md. zone7 and have a woodland garden....for over 30 years...so I am old.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That one sure has a nice leaf pattern.  Mine is fairly plain, from a clone that has been traded among gardeners here for at least 20 years.  Nevertheless, it is very worthy.

The species stolons gently underground, Nancy.  Even as a new plant, I'm not surprised that it was not killed by a misplaced foot.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lori wrote:

There are so many garden-worthy Thalictrum that they probably deserve a thread of their own.

Here is one of last year's additions to the garden, Thalictrum ichangense 'Evening Star'.  (I see that it is sometimes referred to as 'Evening Star Strain', which seems sensible, seeing the considerable variation between the two plants I bought.)

great leaves on this one!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

It's not much in the flower department, but the foliage is very pretty and fine on Thalictrum minus:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori wrote:

It's not much in the flower department, but the foliage is very pretty and fine on Thalictrum minus:

I'm a real fancy of this species. According to Wikipedia, the species has an extensive native range!..."Thalictrum minus is a perennial herb the family Ranunculaceae that is native to Yemen, Europe, Northwest Africa, Ethiopia, South Africa, Southwest Asia, and Siberia. It grows on cliffs and rocky gullies at 1,600 to 3,000 m (5,200 to 9,800 ft) elevation. It grows to 30 cm (0.98 ft) tall with erect stems and 1 cm (0.39 in) triangular leaves."

I grow a variety named T. minus 'Adiantifolium'.  I don't know the standing of such a name, but plants sold under that name seem to be a particular fine form with clouds of yellowish flowers, one of my most favorite woodland plants.  There was one published Thalictrum adianthifolium Besser ex Eichw., but that is not an accepted name these days.

T. minus 'Adiantifolium' in my garden, May 2006.

...and in May 2010

...and in May 2011.  It's a very reliable plant, even surviving drought.  I have never found a single seedling, even though it makes lots of seed.

In July 09, 2011, I visited the garden of Kris Fenderson in Acworth, New Hampshire, with Chris Chadwell and his son Matthew Chadwell.  In this view, I'm snapping a few photos of an impressive clump of T. flavum growing in full sun, but in a wet soil obviously suiting this plant well.  Kris and Chris (left to right respectively) are in the scene as Kris leads us on a garden tour.

In 2010, I attended a New England Chapter NARGS tour of 3 gardens, and was taken by a bed of various Thalictrum species in the garden of Roy & Helen Herold, mostly tall thalictra type, all of which have beautiful foliage.  Here's a scene showing 5 species growing in close proximity... yes, the one that looks like parsley with highly divided shiny leaves is indeed a Thalictrum; although I can't remember the species names at this point.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Peter George
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-03

Sun, part-sun, mostly shade or complete shade?

Peter George, Petersham, MA (north central MA, close to the NH/VT borders), zones 5b and 6 around the property.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Hard to believe you didn't make special note of that "parsley" thalictrum, Mark.  It is definitely a eye catcher!

My Thalictrum flavum always leans to the sun, too.  Consequently, I don't really grow it on purpose anymore, but I always have some seedlings coming up here or there...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Hard to believe you didn't make special note of that "parsley" thalictrum, Mark.  It is definitely a eye catcher!

My Thalictrum flavum always leans to the sun, too.  Consequently, I don't really grow it on purpose anymore, but I always have some seedlings coming up here or there...

I scribbled a note someplace about what the "parsley-leafed" Thalictrum was. I recall writing a note about what species it was, but memory fails me now, and of course I have no idea about where the notes I wrote down are.  I could ask Helen or Roy to remind me of its identity.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A couple common thalictra, at opposite ends of the spectrum.

On the gigantic side, is Thalictrum rochebrunianum, growing to 8' tall.  It'll grow with considerable sun, if moist enough, where it flowers more profusely.  Mine are in shade, and seed around quite a bit, but it's impressive to have to look up to a plant's floral display.  It literally flowers for a couple months.  I purchased my plant from a nursery labeled as T. flavum :rolleyes:  It is among the minority of Thalictra with showy petals (sepals).

At the opposite end of the spectrum is the rock-garden-sized T. kiusianum, only a few inches tall, also in bloom for months.  It's nice having such plants in bloom in mid August.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Thalictrum kiusianum (Kyushu Meadow Rue) is a wonderful mat former, too.  Although it spreads rather slowly. 

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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