Major renovations

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I am planning a major renovation in my garden too - I have to remove a lot of oversized trees and shrubs, and a lot of weeds! But I do not know when I get the time!
Do the reticulated leaves in the first picture belong to Eriobotrya japonica?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Rick - the greenhouse is one we built when we started the garden over 30 years ago. The propagator is a simple but nice one with bottom heat, mostly for the winter. We have never used more sophisticated techniques like Mist, but usually the time tested frames and prop boxes that work well for alpines and smaller woody plants, but also seed which I find most stimulating of all (nothing like pricking out seedlings!). We have some silver woven shading material which allows ca. 50% light transmission which will shade the south end of the greenhouse.

Trond - yes the leaves are Eriobotyra. Further along, out of view, is a large plant of Lyonothamnus. Our incentive is that we have always opened the garden but there has always, inevitably, also been a tension between the garden side and the nursery. For me though they are completely complementary too and I wouldn't be without either of them! I don't mind a bit of wilderness around me!!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

We are lucky this winter in having very mild weather and a good bit of sun and it has enabled us to keep weeding and renovating the garden. The pictures show this in progress but don't show some of the undergrowth before we started, particularly the spreading shoots of brambles and nettles. (Some parts of the garden had been neglected for several years!). Things are now coming together a little, though there is still much to do. Always nice at this time are the beds full of woodland plants, starting with the snowdrops and hellebores, which are just starting to flower and will soon make quite a show. Anemones, eryrthroniums, trilliums and so on will follow. These beds we top dress with good well broken down compost as can be seen around the group of snowdrops. A little different to the more detailed cultivation of alpines! But very satisfying seeing the garden come to life early in the year.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Quite a garden! More like a park!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

It will be 3 to 4 months before our gardens here are at that stage!

Tim, you certainly have a lot of evergreen perennials.  They really add to the winter and early spring vista.  Good luck with your continuing "battle"!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lina Hesseling
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-09-18

Tim, it is great to hear you're making progress. The pictures show this. Are you still planning to open the nursery in spring? Did I understand it well, there was a nursery before? What is the name of the nursery?

Lina.

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Lina - we ran a small specialist nursery with the garden from the mid-1980's, growing many drought tolerant plants, alpines and woodland perennials. We aim to go back to this but on a smaller scale and concentrating especially on alpines and more choice perennials. Alpines in particular are being grown by fewer and fewer nurseries in the UK, and this must have a knock on effect on the number of gardeners likely to grow them. The nursery is just under my name.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

This bed in the middle of the garden is full of bulbs and every few years gets a new topdressing with gravel. This tends to stimulate activity nearby in the garden too and the woodland, which is full of hellebores and snowdrops in particular has also had a good tidy up. Unfortunately our garden is rather large so other areas don't look quite so good, but working steadily like this can have a big impact and it's great to see plants beginning to grow away (for example Helleborus thibetanus is just starting now elsewhere in the garden, and it is pleasing when such a special plant is establishing well).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Anonymous
Title: Guest

Tim,  Do you put any barrier under your gravel beds to prevent the gravel from sinking into the soil?

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim wrote:

This bed in the middle of the garden is full of bulbs and every few years gets a new topdressing with gravel. This tends to stimulate activity nearby in the garden too and the woodland, which is full of hellebores and snowdrops in particular has also had a good tidy up. Unfortunately our garden is rather large so other areas don't look quite so good, but working steadily like this can have a big impact and it's great to see plants beginning to grow away (for example Helleborus thibetanus is just starting now elsewhere in the garden, and it is pleasing when such a special plant is establishing well).

Seems you make great progress in the renovation!
But to say "unfortunately" of a large (and great) garden :o In my opinion a "garden" can't be huge enough - I would let it develop to a woodland tending itself if I had a larger garden ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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