Some Prairie Wildflowers

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Lathyrus ochroleucus; Hedysarum alpinum... and a cute furry little lupin whose ID puzzles me right now:
       

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

We have tons of those subtle bog orchids! Though yours seems to have wider, more rounded leaves than those here...
I'm surprised to see Hedysarum alpinum so early, though maybe I remember the timing incorrectly...
I haven't been able to get out botanising-beyond the acreage and short walks on the farm- a)its been raining every day all month b) I decided if I'm to have any hope of progress in the garden I have to stay home more...lol.. but its hard not to get out there when I can see things are coming into bloom .... Maybe I should not garden..... oh yeah, and c)have to mow every 5 minutes try to to keep from being overgrown...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

Lori: Great pictures as usual. I posted a couple of pictures of two colour forms of the Coeloglossum viride (Frog Orchid in the UK) from the top of a local mountain last year! Yours is a much more vigorous plant :)

http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=5723.msg160195#msg160195

Zizia aptera: I planted this last autumn, but it didn't make it :'(  I've grown Zizia aurea for a number of years...

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Anonymous
Title: Guest

Stephenb wrote:

If you ever see seed on the Cymopterus or Allium textile (it's never been correct the times I've tried it) I would love to swap, beg, beg...!!

Stephen,  Prairie Moon Nursery offers seed of this species.  James

http://www.prairiemoon.com/seeds/wildflowers-forbs/allium-textile-textil...

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

James wrote:

Stephenb wrote:

If you ever see seed on the Cymopterus or Allium textile (it's never been correct the times I've tried it) I would love to swap, beg, beg...!!

Stephen,  Prairie Moon Nursery offers seed of this species.  James

http://www.prairiemoon.com/seeds/wildflowers-forbs/allium-textile-textil...

Judging from the 2 photos of their seed offering, it is misidentified and definitely not Allium textile.  Their photos are showing a form of Allium canadense.

Here are some photo links that show what Allium textile looks like:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Allium_textile_(2).jpg
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ALTE
http://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/udata/r9ndp23q/pd/allium-textile-2.jpg

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Penstemon nitidus, and Phlox hoodii, clinging to an eroded clay bank, in the river valley:
 

(Excuse the Blackberry photos... actually better than some with my regular camera!!)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Needed some exercise today so I took a bike ride through Bowmont Park.  I enjoy seeing it all through my bike-riding season and today was no exception.

Lovely stands of Monarda fistulosa, Campanula rotundifolia, Gaillardia aristata, Solidago rigida (or so I thought, offhand? Please correct me if I'm wrong):

        

And, along the paved trail, skeleton-weed,Lygodesmia juncea:

  

And, while I was out there, I also pulled a garbage bag-full of goatsbeard, Tragopogon sp., having been inspired by a local gentleman whom I often see out doing this.  Great idea, I thought!  Every year, there seems to be more and more weeds, goatsbeard being a very prominent and increasingly common one.  I only wish the other weeds were as easy to pull as Tragopogon, though. (It being a biennial, I suppose it is not strictly necessary to pull the plants - collecting and disposing of the seeds would suffice - but it is pretty satisfying to yank these things out!  ;-)

On a negative note, I saw a small patch of Campanula rapunculoides along the bike path - I've never noticed it before this year.  I didn't have digging tools with me but I did break off the flowering stems and put them in the trash - at least it won't get to set seed this year.   :-( 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Regarding the Solidago rigida, the inflorescense form seems to be quite diverse across the continent, but the leaves seem always to be the same, smooth and glaucous. Yes?

Monarda fistulosa is my favorite garden size monarda.  The light lavender color is the perfect hue, and not in your face like M. didyma.

 

Goatsbeard seems to be a rather benign invasive here.  I see it in disturbed areas, mostly, but seldom in a good prairie.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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