Eriogonum strictum var. anserinum

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04
Eriogonum strictum var. anserinum

I consider Eriogonum strictum var. anserinum one of the easyest for me to grow.
It's Found growing on gravely slopes, and exposed ridges through out the northern Great Basin in CA,NV,OR,WA,& ID.
It blooms early-late June. Flowers are light yellow, inforesence umbellate/cymose held 6”-8”
above the foliage.
The plants grow as low densely matted mounds, 2”-4” tall, 6”-8” across. The leaves are
silvery gray tomentose and elliptcal-ovate. The leaves are held in an erect or vertical
manner. Especially in their native dry habitat.
Quite showy in bloom as they produce copious flowering scapes that continue to put
out new blossoms for well over a month. If given extra summer moisture they will send up secondary scapes later in the summer. I have had plants grow to 6” tall and 12” across in the garden. Eriogonum strictum seeds around the garden readily, reaching flowering size by their second season. Yet another I recommend for the garden.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I really like this one!
Most of the plants you have shown grow in gravel. How deep rootrun do they need? Do you think they can grow in crevices?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

I think that a bed of gravel some were around 15-20cm deep would be fine. They would do well in a crevice. I have seen them growing on ridges and domes, composed of exposed fissured basalt.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Weiser wrote:

I think that a bed of gravel some were around 15-20cm deep would be fine. They would do well in a crevice. I have seen them growing on ridges and domes, composed of exposed fissured basalt.

OK, thanks. I'll try both and combine. Have to go and get some gravel then! The bedrock however is not basalt but quartz and gneiss so I have to find some nice pieces of basalt to put there.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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