Epimedium 2012

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Oh, yes, Mark.  My "E. pallidum" was actually ID'd as E. x versicolor 'Sulphureum'.  (I was going off memory and got it wrong.)

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

A view on my Epimedium-row. Underneath a part of my fern collection, still dormant.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Looking good there Gerrit, with your eppies raised up like that, it must provide good viewing for those species with shy of semi-concealed flowers.  Do your ferns grow up and over the eppies, are they planted this way to provide shade for the epimediums in summer?  I'd really like to see the same view when the ferns fronds are aloft, good dual use of space to have eppies in bloom while ferns are still dormant.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Zonedenial
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-11

Out of about 75 varieties in our garden, E. Pink Champagne may be my favorite; lovely colors, large flowers, nicely spotted foliage, and a long time in bloom.

Don Bolin  Zone 5a in eastern Iowa, USA (corn country).

gerrit
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03
Zonedenial wrote:

Out of about 75 varieties in our garden, E. Pink Champagne may be my favorite; lovely colors, large flowers, nicely spotted foliage, and a long time in bloom.

Good to have another Epimedium lover on the forum. Wellcome! Your start, with that wonderful "Pink Champagne' is a very good start, because it's one of the species which are not available in Western Europe, as far as I know. And I am jealous like hell.

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03
McDonough wrote:

Looking good there Gerrit, with your eppies raised up like that, it must provide good viewing for those species with shy of semi-concealed flowers.  Do your ferns grow up and over the eppies, are they planted this way to provide shade for the epimediums in summer?  I'd really like to see the same view when the ferns fronds are aloft, good dual use of space to have eppies in bloom while ferns are still dormant.

Wright Mark, 'space-sharing' in my garden. I have an open sunny garden with less shade. In summer when the ferns reach their maximum size I have to cut some leaves indeed. I planned the size of ferns and the size of Epimediums. Some large ones like the wushanenses, are combined with the big ferns.Here a picture from Oct 26 2011, a general view from my first floor and behind the Acer you see the ferns.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Really nice epimediums, everyone.  My few are not that photogenic yet.

Welcome to the forum, Don!  Glad to see you state-side.  ;D  You must have a wonderful garden, with all those epimediums and snowdrops, and all the other things you grow.  We'd love to see them all!Your very special seed arrived yesterday.  Thank you so much!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
RickR wrote:

Really nice epimediums, everyone.  My few are not that photogenic yet.

Seconded! Some have started flowering today, or better I noticed the blooming today. Had some sun and nice (for me - that is +10C and no wind) temperature.I got hold of a new plant yesterday, E. wushanense 'Sandy Claws'  :) Hope it will grow here!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Gerrit, your photo shows well the dual-use garden space planting with ferns and eppies.  Your garden is beautiful, with the sloping rock garden and serene pool, anchored with a Japanese maple (what variety is it; Japanese maples is another area I could be totally caught up with, oh brother!).

Don, welcome to the forum, and particularly to the Epimedium topic :).  Having 75 species and varieties is a good start ;)  (actually, that's a pretty darn good collection). Is the photo of 'Pink Champagne' from this year or a previous year.  My 'Pink Champagne' is just emerging, although 'Domino', a few feet away, and from the same cross, is starting to flower.

Here are a couple "eppie" views, the first showing a garden view with E. brachyrrhizum in the background, and the second is a closeup view of the same species.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

The current heat wave has brought on Epimedium growth and flowering with such speed, that day by day it's hard to keep up, particularly now during the work week.  In no particular order, I have a cavalcade of photos to show, tis epimedium season.

Epimedium x 'Amanogawa' - one of the best and most unique Asiatic hybrids.

E. 'Sunshowers', a beautiful light yellow hybrid from Far Reaches Farm and introduced by Darrell Probst.

E. pinnatum ssp. colchicum - an evergreen species with bright yellow spikes of bloom.

E. x warleyense - the red-orange epimedium, I get best flowering and deepest flower and leaf color when grown in full sun.

E. x warleyense 'Orangekonigin' - from the same cross (E. alpinum x pinnatum ssp. colchicum), similar but with paler soft salmon orange flowers.

E. grandiflorum 'Red Queen' is an impressive giant grandiflorum, my plant nearly 4' across x 2-1/2' tall.

I get lots and lots of hybrid seedlings, most are not worthy of naming, but are certainly nice additions to the garden; here's one such hybrid.  It has the purple banded foliage of E. grandiflorum v. higoense 'Bandit', but with large white flowers tinged lavender.  It isstaying compact with large flowers well presented above the foliage.

One of the many hybrid seedlings here, I love watching them bloom for the first time, and watching in subsequent years 3 and 4, to see how they clump up and develop.  Here's one with nice deep color flowers with a diffuse white stripe down the middle of each sepal.

Epimedium x versicolor 'Versicolor' is among the first to bloom, but keeps on going in subtle profusion of pastel peach flowers and bronze-toned foliage.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

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