Corydalis scouleri?

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Jeddeloh
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-05-02

Trond, too bad we don't live near each other or we could exchange pollen of Corydalis scouleri.  I too have only one clone so I never get any viable seed either.  It's native to Oregon but I don't know exactly where it grows.  I guess I should tell my buddies in the Native Plant Society to keep an eye out for it.

And as we both know trying to send you a chunk of my clone, or vice versa, is a non starter.  :D

Jan

Jan Jeddeloh, Portland, Oregon, USA, Zone 8.  Rainy winters (40 inches or 1 meter) and pleasant dry summers which don't start until July most years!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Sending dried Lilium pollen through the mail is often successful.  I don't know if it would work for Corydalis, but this is what I would do if you want to try:Remove ripening stamens and dry on paper tin foil for 2 days (3 to 4 days for Lilium spp.).  Fold up tin foil and send.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
RickR wrote:

Sending dried Lilium pollen through the mail is often successful.  I don't know if it would work for Corydalis, but this is what I would do if you want to try:Remove ripening stamens and dry on paper for 2 days (3 to 4 days for Lilium spp.).  Fold up paper and send.

Rick, that is a good idea!

Jan wrote:

Trond, too bad we don't live near each other or we could exchange pollen of Corydalis scouleri.  I too have only one clone so I never get any viable seed either.  It's native to Oregon but I don't know exactly where it grows.  I guess I should tell my buddies in the Native Plant Society to keep an eye out for it.

And as we both know trying to send you a chunk of my clone, or vice versa, is a non starter.  :D

Jan

Jan, don't remind me of that, I am still depressed :'(

But Rick's idea is a possibility, don't you agree? Or maybe powder in the mail is something some people are very suspicious of?

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Jeddeloh
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-05-02

Hi, Trond,I can try to harvest pollen when the plants bloom.  I believe you can also freeze lily pollen so I wonder if that would work for corydalis?  I suppose we could try it unless we get lucky and our plants bloom at the same time.  We'd both want to label it carefully due to paranoid plant cops.

I was hoping to find a plant at our Western Winter Study Weekend but I was out of luck.  There are a number of plant sales coming up in the Portland area so I'll be looking for it. I'll also ask my friends who do a lot of hiking to keep a look out for it.  Maybe they can score some fresh seed.

Jan

Jan Jeddeloh, Portland, Oregon, USA, Zone 8.  Rainy winters (40 inches or 1 meter) and pleasant dry summers which don't start until July most years!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Indeed you can freeze lily pollen.  Once it is thawed, it is said to lose viability quickly.  Some say refreezing thawed pollen is fruitless, while others say it can be done.

A correction to my last post:It's better to send pollen in folded tin foil.  Paper might absorb moisture if the air is not dry, and that could mean death for the pollen.  I suppose that optimally, a sealed container would be the ultimate.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
Jan wrote:

Hi, Trond,I can try to harvest pollen when the plants bloom.  I believe you can also freeze lily pollen so I wonder if that would work for corydalis?  I suppose we could try it unless we get lucky and our plants bloom at the same time.  We'd both want to label it carefully due to paranoid plant cops.

I was hoping to find a plant at our Western Winter Study Weekend but I was out of luck.  There are a number of plant sales coming up in the Portland area so I'll be looking for it. I'll also ask my friends who do a lot of hiking to keep a look out for it.  Maybe they can score some fresh seed.

Jan

Quite so! And Trillium seeds are germinating now as I told in another thread too ;)

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

I have several clones, and collect a large amount of seed from them.  If you want some, send me a private message.  But these plants are not easy to germinate.  I would give them a couple of months of warmth, followed by winter temps for several months.  But I would not let them freeze hard.  They make a long taproot, and do not like high soil temperatures.  Maybe the best thing is to sow them where you want the plants to remain.  They need a lot of moisture until late summer.  I grow them in my blueberry patch.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
Gene wrote:

I have several clones, and collect a large amount of seed from them.  If you want some, send me a private message.  But these plants are not easy to germinate.  I would give them a couple of months of warmth, followed by winter temps for several months.  But I would not let them freeze hard.  They make a long taproot, and do not like high soil temperatures.  Maybe the best thing is to sow them where you want the plants to remain.  They need a lot of moisture until late summer.  I grow them in my blueberry patch.

;D

Hi Gene, what kind of blueberry is that? Does it mean that the soil is very acidic?

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25
Hoy wrote:

Gene wrote:

I have several clones, and collect a large amount of seed from them.  If you want some, send me a private message.  But these plants are not easy to germinate.  I would give them a couple of months of warmth, followed by winter temps for several months.  But I would not let them freeze hard.  They make a long taproot, and do not like high soil temperatures.  Maybe the best thing is to sow them where you want the plants to remain.  They need a lot of moisture until late summer.  I grow them in my blueberry patch.

;D

Hi Gene, what kind of blueberry is that? Does it mean that the soil is very acidic?

They are the common edible blueberries.  Soil is quite acidic, but I apply a little lime every year.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Gene, you know what's common blueberries there isn't the same as is common here ;)

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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