QUIZ

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15
QUIZ

It strikes easily from cuttings. Huge leaves for the genus. I do know what it is. Do you?

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Well, if nobody wants to try I'll give you some more facts. The spent flowers of a Buddleia davidii have nothing to do with the leaves, just to compare size.
The plant in question becomes a small tree but most gardenworthy plants of the genus are small shrubs.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

Well, if nobody wants to try I'll give you some more facts. The spent flowers of a Buddleia davidii have nothing to do with the leaves, just to compare size.
The plant in question becomes a small tree but most gardenworthy plants of the genus are small shrubs.

Well, it's not from the lack of interest... I'm intrigued but also stumped!  Been thinking about it :)

Looks sort of like a Polygonum species, but those aren't usually small trees.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

All I can say is it certainly doesn't grow around here (Minnesota)....

Could it be related to the Croton (Codiaeum)?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Neither Polygonum nor Croton.
Here is a Croton relative (I believe), Rick:

[attachthumb=3]

The plant is native to China. The genus is known for showy male and female flowers in tight clusters on separate plants often before the plants leave out. The leaves can achieve a length of 25cm on this species, but the norm is in the opposite end of the scale.

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

It is a Salix. Salix magnifica.

The leaves are attractive and so are the male catkins in spring. I have only old slides of the catkins so you have to take a look at them here:
http://www.gapphotos.com/imagedetails.asp?imageno=104106
http://www.rogerstreesandshrubs.com/gallery/DisplayBlock~bid~7082~gid~~s...

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Now that you say it, I do see.  But the buds are uncharacteristic to the genus, in my opinion, and I don't think I would have ever guessed it.  I've never heard of a Salix species with buds that diverge so prominently from the stem.  Darn it, and I thought I knew everything...    :rolleyes:

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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