Yukon wildflower trip

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Mark McD wrote:

By the way, what is the plant that is captioned "not showy but an oddity"?  It looks like a Corydalis.

LOL, I was wondering the same thing, until I noticed that Linda had already mastered the image embedding.  The name shows up when you hover your cursor over the thumbnail.

 

Oh, it must be a browser-related issue, for me, only a portion of the caption displays when mousing over the image, never do see the plant name.  I went into edit mode as a test, and can see the name of the image and the full caption, with the Corydalis name.  I will test with other versions of my browser, and other browsers.

Sorry Linda to distract from your excellent post with these "forum experiences" questions that we're trying to sort out.  Back to plants, I am really taken by this little Corydalis, not familiar with it. Can you tell us more about this plant, how large or small is it, under what conditions does it grow.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Vaxvick
Vaxvick's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-11-02

Thanks, everyone, for your interest and kind words. 

Yes, the captions (Title on Embedded images) do not always appear - I sympathize with your efforts to debug as I don't see what I did differently for those that appear correctly.

The Corydalis pauciflora was found near North Fork Pass on the Dempster Hwy,  in a willow thicket that had some openings to let sun in.  Somewhat mossy wet place, but not a bog, though we found Chrysosplenium wrightii within a few feet.  John G Trelawney's "Wildflowers of the Yukon, Alaska, & Northwestern Canada" says about the Corydalis "...inhabits moist areas near and above timberline from Alaska and the Yukon, E to the Mackenzie Mtns and S. to N. NB".  It's about 6-8 " tall.

I'll add a photo of Douglasia gormanii.  I should add that we are open to corrections on our species identification for this and others.  The Pedicularis species were not always easy to distinguish.  We used William J Cody's "Flora of the Yukon Territory", 2000 as well as Trelawny.   We loved that you can find this tome in the bookstore in Whitehorse.

Here's the view of what I believe to be Pedicularis sudetica , looking down.

Linda Vaxvick in Calgary, Alberta

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Thanks Linda for showing the Douglasia, a sweet little thing, surrounded with attractive rosettes of what looks to be a Saxifraga species. The spiraling effect on that Pedicularis is really quite special, a plant in motion.

I looked up Corydalis pauciflora in Hulten's Flora of Alaska and Neighboring Territories, and see that it is semi-circumpolar, that is, its range extends to the Altai Mountains. Looking up where exactly that is, I found "a mountain range in East-Central Asia, where Russia, China, Mongolia and Kazakhstan meet".

 

PS: Linda, I fixed the caption on your Corydalis pauciflora photo, it seems that certain characters such as dash " - " or colon " : " become interpreted in some fashio, to only display text after that character, depending on on'e browser.  I changed you caption  (Title Text) to use a comma.  For the next caption to take effect, one deletes the photo in their Edit Preview mode, places the cursor where the photo was, then from the uploaded photos list find your photo, hit the Insert button to re-insert it.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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