Wood anemone and relatives

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Martin wrote:

I just collected a wild A nemorosa with lilla/purple colors in the white. Very nice indeed.
Maybe a new cultivar?
Martin

A nemorosa with lilla/purple colors are not uncommon here. Some clones are more colored than other but often it is related to age of the flower. If your plant show the color from start of flowering then that would be nice.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Love all of these--especially the blue (lilac) and creamy yellow colours..
I sowed some nemorosa in '09 ( I think)..wonder if its time to give up hope of seeing anything?..lol of course nothing is doing anything for this year yet..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Anemone nemorosa 'Vestal', now in bloom:
   

A new little one planted last year, A. nemorosa 'Blue Eyes':

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Our wood anemones are well over, especially with this dry spring, but they were superb in the local woods earlier on - very little variation, just occasionally one a little pinker on opening. However, I was given a very deep pink form, turning purple as it aged, by a customer years ago (we called it 'Westwell Pink' after the woods where it was found). It is strong growing but I think little different to quite a few other forms, just nice for its association with the area.

I grow a good number in the garden including that extraordinary 'Double White Blue Eyes' which I think Irish gardeners first grew. 'Robinsoniana' and 'Allenii' have long been favourites, as well as the beautiful cross between nemorosa and ranunculoides. There is not much I can find written about them but there is a good article in 'The Plantsman', Vol.3 (1981/2), pp.167-174, by Ulrich Toubøl where he speaks of quite significant variation in beech woods in Denmark and describes most of the well known varieties. I have visions of them carpeting under our rows of apple trees after the snowdrops and hellebores have finished and I also plant them around hostas which are so much later to come into growth and take over for the summer.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

My first plants of Anemone rivularis (from seed) bloomed in 2009 with some rather wimpy, but nicely colored white flowers with purple-blue tinted petal backs.  The 2010 spring was rather warm, but with ample rainfall.  Anemone rivularis shot up strong 12+ inch stems in pots and 24 inch stems in the garden.  Flowers were far more robust, larger, and with more petals. But the heat (I assume) of the early summer (June) washed every bit of color out of the pristine white flowers.  But they were still quite nice.

       

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Bravo, Rick! Anemone is one of my favorite genera!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Nice one, Rick, good to see these- I wasn't clear on how different rivularis would look from my local cylindrica, but I see its quite different... much showier flowers.. I've decided the greatest advantages of cylindrica are non-floral- nice leaves including fall colour sometimes, and wooly cylindrical seedheads persisting through winter..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

It will be a little while until the wood anemones appear again but to whet the appetite these are pictures of stands of A. nemorosa in Blean Woods near to Canterbury last spring. En masse like this they are very lovely, but there is hardly any variation, just a few going pink as they age.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Well done, Rick!  You certainly have a lot more patience with seed-starting than I do.

What a beautiful sight, Tim!

Here is a bad photo, unfortunately, but after pondering it many times, I finally realized it's Anemone richardsonii, a yellow-flowered species that I had not seen before.  This little colony is growing in wet conditions along a stream in a subalpine meadow in Banff N. P..

             

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Cohan, Anemone cylindrica is common her also.  Long ago, I too took notice of the foliage, and "discarded" the flowers.  Fall color is always nice here. 

I have grown two A. rivularis batches from two different sources to flowering (although no provenance was ever mentioned), and they are quite literally identical.  I have two more batches coming, hoping that one of the four will have more "blue" on the petals for better ornamental value.

Tim, a very lovely woodland carpet!  In our native woodlands it is very uncommon to see such large dominance of a single native herbaceous species, unless it has reduced itself to non-flowering status and acts simply as a groundcover (ex: Big leaf aster in the shade).  Our woodland herbs tend to remain quite diverse in their natural setting.  A sign of a healthy ecosystem, I would hope.  Of course, we are not talking about any invasive materials, and in a garden stiuation natives can overtake, too.

Thalictrum thalictroides, our native Mayflower, would eventually overtake parts of my garden if I didn't keep it in check.  The species  makes a very nice background plant, as in this photo, with Syneilesis aconitifolia.

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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