Why Do I Keep Trying To Grow Things I Know Can't Survive In My Garden?

11 posts / 0 new
Last post
Anonymous
Title: Guest
Why Do I Keep Trying To Grow Things I Know Can't Survive In My Garden?

Hoy wrote:

Why do we ever strive to get a garden at all with plants not naturally belonging to the landscape ;D
For example, why should I want to grow Yuccas in my garden - creating a lot of work and trouble for myself! It is unbelievable - but very fun ;D ;D

Hope

I know the feeling. I am mulling over ordering seed of Eritrichiums and Kelseya yet again. The last time I did this none even germinated. That was before I knew how dry the seeds had to be kept to prevent rotting. Even though I failed miserably before, I still want to try again. This is the case even though I know the heat and humidity of summer would almost surely kill them.

Sometimes unexpected successes occur which compels us to roll the dice once again. For example, as a bonus I received Penstemon whippleanus in an order. I did not think it could survive in my climate since it hails from 10,860 feet. However, I now have six of them growing in pots. I had to move them into the shade when heat became an issue. This made them somewhat lanky. However, they are still alive. Maybe next year I will find them a better semi-shady spot where they can grow stronger and flower. Successes like this make me think, if I can get this species to survive then what else could I grow from the same cold windy habitat.

James

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

James - I remember the excitement when I saw Eritrichium howardii germinating in my seed frame one year. I went on to grow it up to flowering size and exhibited it in our local Show. I think our other members liked seeing it but it was only me that felt really proud. Of course it proved difficult to keep over time! There is immense joy in seeing a plant grow well that one has grown from seed and a really good reason to become a nurseryman!!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Schier
Schier's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-02-16

I think it's half the fun sometimes, trying something that is a "maybe, just maybe". As you said, James , once in awhile a person has success, and it's such a feeling of satisfaction. Makes up for the ones that don't even get big enough to curl up and die. Well, usually makes up for it.  And of course, I always try more than once with the hard if not impossible to grow plants, I make myself crazy, but I keep on doing it.

Faith S.   Gardening in central Alberta climate, from min. -44 c to max. 36+ C. ( not often! ) Avg. annual precip. ~ 48 cm  Altitude ~ 820 m. Have "frying pan gardens" up around the house, and also some woodland areas down the pa

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Yes, that's genetics ;) (Although I prefere to use my feet.)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Schier
Schier's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-02-16

James wrote:

I wonder if trying to grow things you know has almost no chance of survival is a guy thing?  Kind of like jumping off a cliff pretending to be a flying squirrel! 

http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=893.msg13033#msg13033

Most women tend to be smart enough to avoid taking risks that are not likely to be worth the effort.

James

Wellllll.... I'm one of those women who tries to grow things that have a tiny chance of survival...
hehe.  Mostly from seed though, I don't buy many/if any pricey plants that have little to no chance of making it, unless I grow it as an annual, nah, come to think of it, I'm always tempted, oh, so tempted, but can never afford it. You're right though, none of that jumping off a cliff for me!

Faith S.   Gardening in central Alberta climate, from min. -44 c to max. 36+ C. ( not often! ) Avg. annual precip. ~ 48 cm  Altitude ~ 820 m. Have "frying pan gardens" up around the house, and also some woodland areas down the pa

Sellars
Sellars's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

The most challenging thing for me is continuing to fail, year after year,  to grow say, Aquilegia jonesii and then someone locally in the same climate claiming it is easy!  On closer inspection you realize they are actually growing  Aquilegia bertolonii that was mislabelled as A. jonesii in the seed exchange.  Then what do you say?

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
www.mountainflora.ca
MountainFlora videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Doreen
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-12-05

James wrote:

I wonder if trying to grow things you know has almost no chance of survival is a guy thing?  Kind of like jumping off a cliff pretending to be a flying squirrel!  

http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=893.msg13033#msg13033

Most women tend to be smart enough to avoid taking risks that are not likely to be worth the effort.

James

Hello James!
No, not a guy thing, I try and grow things all the time that I really haven't a hope with, hence I've been outside all afternoon watering some very sad wilted meconopsis and primulas. I should stick to Lewisia rediviva.

And re flying squirrels, for my last big birthday with a '0' on the end I asked my sisters to club together to pay for a tandem paraglide off the top of a cliff in Queenstown, which was fantastic, but maybe that means I'm not very smart!  ;D

Doreen Mear
Middle of South Island, New Zealand, in the rain shadow of the Southern Alps.
Continental climate, rare snow cover,
670 mm rain p.a.

Anonymous
Title: Guest

Doreen wrote:

And re flying squirrels, for my last big birthday with a '0' on the end I asked my sisters to club together to pay for a tandem paraglide off the top of a cliff in Queenstown, which was fantastic, but maybe that means I'm not very smart!  ;D

You must have done something right to jump off a cliff and make it back in one piece.  Proving you have superior genes that would increase the chance of survival of future offspring?  I know if I jumped off a cliff I would bounce all the way down.  My wife definitely would not be impressed.

James

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

One of my daughters do (or did) things like that (jump off cliffs etc). Now she is studying geology ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Doreen
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-12-05

James wrote:

You must have done something right to jump off a cliff and make it back in one piece.  Proving you have superior genes that would increase the chance of survival of future offspring?  I know if I jumped off a cliff I would bounce all the way down.  My wife definitely would not be impressed.

James

[/quote]

Haven't produced any Junior Lemmings so the superior genes (if any) will die with me at the bottom of the cliff. (P.S. I was actually strapped to an instructor when I did this jump, it wasn't a solo effort!) Also, your wife might be more impressed if you increased your life insurance cover?  ;D 

Doreen Mear
Middle of South Island, New Zealand, in the rain shadow of the Southern Alps.
Continental climate, rare snow cover,
670 mm rain p.a.

Doreen
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-12-05

:D

Doreen Mear
Middle of South Island, New Zealand, in the rain shadow of the Southern Alps.
Continental climate, rare snow cover,
670 mm rain p.a.

Log in or register to post comments