This where I get thrown out of all the rock garden societies

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penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24
This where I get thrown out of all the rock garden societies

By posting a picture of my idea of rock garden design.
Bob

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Er! Well! It looks to be a fair scree ;D

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

And natural looking, with the different size aggregates...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Anonymous
Title: Guest

This looks like the gravel moraines in my area.  Perfect habitat for Bird's-Foot Violet, Hoary Puccoon, Fringed Puccoon, Prairie Smoke, Violet Woodsorrel, Small Skullcap, Purple Prairie Clover, White Prairie Clover, Cylindrical Blazing Star, Silky Aster, Sky Blue Aster, Smooth Blue Aster, Hill Prairie ecotype of Shooting Star, Yellow Star Grass, Prairie Phlox, Prairie Onion, Prairie Gentian, Seneca Snakeroot, Side-Oats Grama Grass, Little Bluestem, Prairie Dropseed, Carex umbellata, Carex richardsonii and many other great plants.

James

youngman54
youngman54's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-11-04

Well Bob you may well need to fall on your sword on this one. However i would be grateful for your Scree two months ago i moved house it had 4 lawns. I have dug up 2 already and at least one more to go.

Will Youngman
Comrie Scotland

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

That is something I could have! Why haven't you put plants in already?

Here's mine:

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

The new rock garden is actually filled with plants. I hesitate to name them, for fear of bringing the wrath of Nemesis. The other two thirds of this garden are filled with plants that no one else in the world grows and that no one else will ever have unless they come here to take cuttings (talk about Nemesis ...). Could rock gardening be any better than this?

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Schier
Schier's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-02-16

I enjoyed this last post of yours Bob, hehe... I know all too well the feeling of not
naming the new treasures.  I also have a new rock garden ready for the spring, well, more
of a sand bed/rock garden area and I'll be putting in some teenage plants grown from seed.
That is - if they make it through the winter, and then, maybe I'll tempt fate and name
them and put up a photo...

Faith S.   Gardening in central Alberta climate, from min. -44 c to max. 36+ C. ( not often! ) Avg. annual precip. ~ 48 cm  Altitude ~ 820 m. Have "frying pan gardens" up around the house, and also some woodland areas down the pa

youngman54
youngman54's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-11-04

Bob you are really teasing us, will follow this one with interest.

Regards Will

Will Youngman
Comrie Scotland

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Looks like an enviable garden for alpines, needless to say... much the same sort of substrate that we see in various places on our local hikes:  
 

And not so different from this... if you squint a little...  ;D  

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Not exactly the same topic, but two out of three of these are plants that no one else has. Ha!
Three dwarf Picea pungens from Jerry Morris. Top to bottom, "319", "MU 92", and 'Clark's Tiny'. The last was named for the late Clark Coe and is probably in the trade.
(The plants in the new rock garden, the plants that no one else has, are also from Jerry, snatched up right before he decided to give up his dwarf conifer business. I killed a few, naturally, and also wish I'd gotten more plants from him.)
Visitors sometimes ask what I do with the pots in the winter. The answer is, "Nothing". The roots of P. pungens are not damaged at temperatures of -100C when the plants are dormant, and the water needs are next to zero in winter anyway. Insufficient hydration of the plants prior to the onset of dormancy may lead to death, so I do make sure the pots get watered in autumn.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

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