When to take cuttings Of Salix x boydii??

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Reed
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When to take cuttings Of Salix x boydii??

I would like to take cuttings of my Salix x boydii and was wondering if anyone has had a bit more experience with this Salix. The last time I took cuttings of it I only got one to grow (maybe that is all I can expect?). I don't know if I should take Hardwood cuttings, softwood cuttings or what. I thought about taking some now and keeping them in my greenhouse in the misting system. Any recommendation's would be good. Thanks

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

I have no experience with S. x boydii but other types of Salix. I always take hardwood cuttings in late fall and stick through a sheet of plastic in ordinary garden soil in my kitchen garden. Usually almost all root. I do not bother covering the cuttings, but they are stuck deep - 2/3 covered by soil.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Reed
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Trond,
Thank you for the help, I love Salix x boydii it is so slow growing though that the cuttings are generally small no more than 6-8cm long at best. I tried to locate another one to buy but I have not been able to find another one. the same with the miniature Iris minutoaurea :(. But I keep on looking  :)

Albany, Oregon USA. Pacific Northwest, elevation approximately 200ft zone 8. Winter wet and Summer Dry. Hot enough to ripen the peaches.

Hoy
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By the way, I remember another approach with cuttings if you have few. You cleave the piece of stem you have in two halves and place the wounded side down and keep in place with a piece of wire stuck in the soil. I have not tried this on Salix but it should work.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Apparently both its parents (S. lanata, S. reticulata) root easily, so I would expect the same for S. ×boydii.  I don't have experience with either.  Hardwood cuttings, taken early to mid winter is optimal for most willows.  No additional hormones are needed for rooting.  Some willows, though they root easily, transplant with difficulty, so take care.

Regarding Iris minutoaurea, you might also find it under the name of Iris arenaria.  Send me a message around the end of April.  I should be able to fix you up with a division.  It certainly is a honey!

Iris minutoaurea

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

I've rooted this one no problem in mid-July...I did use a mist chamber but I didn't use any rooting hormone.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

paulhschneider
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Joined: 2010-01-20

Salix Xboydii is listed in the 2011 ForestFarm catalog. I've had good luck with them. Good luck pauls.

WimB
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Hi James,

I had a similar question about Salix moupinensis a couple of months ago and I got an interesting answer about trying cuttings on water, it would seem it's best if you try willow cuttings on willow water: you can see the response here: http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=6160.msg170042#msg170042

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

WimB
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RickR wrote:

Regarding Iris minutoaurea, you might also find it under the name of Iris arenaria.  Send me a message around the end of April.  I should be able to fix you up with a division.  It certainly is a honey!

Rick,

that's a particularly beautiful Iris of which I had never heard before. Does it set seed easily?

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

It occurs to me there are no photos of Salix x boydii yet, so here's one.  When I lived in Seattle Washington, I bought my house from a elderly NARGS member, and he left behind troughs and rock gardens filled with goodies.  One was a trough with an ancient gnarled Salix x boydii.  It was large enough to take cuttings regularly, which I did, and while slow to root with some bottom heat, a good percentage did root.

Going back through my photos of garden visits in 2010, I came across this one of a young recently planted S. x boydii in Peter George's garden.

@Wim: regarding Iris minutoaurea, I hope that it's okay that I'm answering a question directed at Rick; I do get some sparse seed set on I. minutoaurea, the pods are prone to rotting off in hot humid weather and in some years no seed is successfully produced.  Here are a couple links to photos I posted on SRGC:
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=5627.msg156824#msg156824
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=4736.msg128032#msg128032

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
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McDonough wrote:

@Wim: regarding Iris minutoaurea, I hope that it's okay that I'm answering a question directed at Rick; I do get some sparse seed set on I. minutoaurea, the pods are prone to rotting off in hot humid weather and in some years no seed is successfully produced.  Here are a couple links to photos I posted on SRGC:
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=5627.msg156824#msg156824
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=4736.msg128032#msg128032

Mark, thanks for your answer. You can see I don't read all postings on the SRGC forum...I hadn't seen that posting (or I forgot).
Anyhow, it's a beautiful Iris. I'll have to try it....I'll put it on my want list as number gazillion and one  :rolleyes:

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

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