What do you see on your garden walks 2014?

125 posts / 0 new
Last post
Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Looks lovely!  

An interesting plant from seed last year... Salvia nutans:

  

Viola canadensis:

  

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Looking forward to see the colour of that Salvia although the shape is nice also!

I have some seedlings of what I thought were Viola canadensis. The flowers look is the same as yours Lori but the leaves are much narrower. Do you know whether the leaves can vary?

 

Fuchsia magellanica is in flower now and that is the earliest I have seen here. Usually I have to wait till July/August.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I've never seen Viola canadensis with narrow leaves, only with quite broad, heart-shaped ones.  A couple of references I'm looking at say "ovate to reniform", pointed at the apex, and may be over 3" wide.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Here is a picture (out of flower at the moment) but you can see the leaves. I got an email telling me it could be Viola lanceolata, which seems plausible.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The roses are very early this year. Some have already passed the summit but others are in full flower now.

Here is the first flowers on a seedling of a species rose, Rosa webbiana, from China. Grown from Chadwell seeds planted a couple of years ago.

It has to be moved next winter because it soon outgrows the space here in the kindergarten.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

A nice rose. Is it fragrant? Once-blooming?

Unless I'm wildly mistaken, and some toothy-leaved invader has filled the spaces, Scrophularia macratha ("red birds in a tree") seems to have wintered over, and is taking on the upright form it should have (as compared to the very lax, recumbent stems of the plants when I bought them late last summer - that's what indoor growing does.  A lot of nurseries keep plants indoors here, due to hail danger, I guess.)

  

An odd yellow-flowered Ranunculus(?) I planted(?) last year - must figure out what it is:

    

Dracocephalum nutans; Lithospermum ruderale; Verbascum atroviolaceum - a compact, shiny leaved species; Phyteuma charmellii, in bud:

      

Pulsatilla vulgaris - these big old plants are magnificent, especially in seed - only a few still in bloom; Anemone canadensis, which I have still not got rid of (this year, maybe); Doronicum orientale; Pleurospermum szechenyii:

      

Clematis alpina - seedlings of what was supposed to be 'Pamela Jackman' though wasn't (turned out to be a double, rather than a single flower):

      

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hoy wrote:

Here is a picture (out of flower at the moment) but you can see the leaves. I got an email telling me it could be Viola lanceolata, which seems plausible.

Very interesting foliage.  Definitely not Viola canadensis.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

"Anemone canadensis, which I have still not got rid of (this year, maybe);"

 

Good luck on that one, Lori.  Anemone canadensis showed up one year and looked so lovely in the seed pot that I planted it out, not knowing what it was.  Five years later, I finally dug the last of it out.  Round-up is not a product I use in the garden but I made an exception in the case of R. canadensis.  Its thread-like roots sprout at every node.  That's a shame, because it's a beautiful brute.

Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori S. wrote:

A nice rose. Is it fragrant? Once-blooming?

 

I suppose it is once-blooming and I have not yet detected any fragrance, neither during the day nor in the evening.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Regarding Anemone canadensis I once tried it in my woodland. Had a lot of it in a bed  here at home and moved it in spring. It lasted but one season. Slugfood.

Fortunately I planted a piece of it at my summerhouse where it behaves very well and spreads a little where it is allowed to do.

Crab spiders like to hide in the flower:

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Pages

Log in or register to post comments