What do you see on your garden walks? 2013

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

That Pyrethrum is amazing- I forget, have you seen flowers yet?

Not yet - this is its first winter.  I'm not overly concerned about the Salvia pachyphylla just yet despite its bedraggled appearance - I had one out front in regular soil that looked about the same coming out of winter.  Unfortunately, it never amounted to anything and got broken off (from being raked over, I think).

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Hoy wrote:

Dave, a special Oenothera, nice colours!

IMYoung wrote:

Great colour combination on that Oenethera,T00lie - might it be O. falklandica?

McDonough wrote:

Dave, I don't think your colorful Oenothera is O. fruticosa or a variety of it.  Was intrigued to see Maggi's suggestion of E. falklandica; never heard of it, and could only find one photo of it (use the link below, scroll down to find it), showing similarly colored blooms. Searching on The Plant List, IPNI.ORG, and Tropicos, indicate that Oenothera "falklandica" is not a validly published name, possibly a horticultural invention, there are a good number of such non-existant species out in horticulture-land.  Now I'm interested in finding out what this plant really is!
http://www.buytech.biz/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_OENOTHERA_1219.html

...and the same photo in another link, but you can compare with a few photos of O. fruticosa and vars.
http://www.cgf.net/plants.aspx?genus=OENOTHERA

Thanks Trond /Maggi

I had queried the name i gave earlier as when Googling Oenothera i came across pictures of my plant labelled as O.fruticosa ssp glauca which under 'The Plant List' is an unresolved named.

And just to add to the confusion the name should be blood orange not as i have called it ,blood yellow--duh !!!....... :-[

Sorry i can't help you further Mark.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Toole wrote:

IMYoung wrote:

Great colour combination on that Oenethera,T00lie - might it be O. falklandica?

McDonough wrote:

Dave, I don't think your colorful Oenothera is O. fruticosa or a variety of it.  Was intrigued to see Maggi's suggestion of O. falklandica; never heard of it, and could only find one photo of it (use the link below, scroll down to find it), showing similarly colored blooms. Searching on The Plant List, IPNI.ORG, and Tropicos, indicate that Oenothera "falklandica" is not a validly published name, possibly a horticultural invention, there are a good number of such non-existant species out in horticulture-land.  Now I'm interested in finding out what this plant really is!

Thanks Trond /Maggi

I had queried the name i gave earlier as when Googling Oenothera i came across pictures of my plant labelled as O.fruticosa ssp glauca which under 'The Plant List' is an unresolved named.

And just to add to the confusion the name should be blood orange not as i have called it ,blood yellow--duh !!!....... :-[

Cheers Dave.

Right, I hadn't cottoned on to the fact that the Blood Orange was a name and not just a description.... a search for  OENOTHERA 'BLOOD ORANGE' doesn't get us much further though....

http://hobbykafe.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1388&start=15  =Bulgarian site

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Imberhorne-Lane-Nursery-OENOTHERA-ORANGE/dp/B006... =seeds for sale

http://members.gardenweb.com/members/exch/audrey  = seed swap

I've written to Bob Brown of Cotswold Garden Flowers to see what else he can tell us of is "falklandica"

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

From a brief search, I find there are a number of orange Oenothera species/cultivars going around, the one that comes up the most is Oenothera versicolor, with cultivar names like 'Sunset Boulevard' and 'Endless Orange'.  Just google images for Oenothera versicolor and you will see lots of these.

Now, O. versicolor is considered a synonym for the accepted name of O. campylocalyx.
The synonym list for O. campylocalyx include:
O. coccinea
O. curvifolia
O. fusca
O. scabra
O. versicolor
O. weberbaueri
Onagra fusca
This is a species from South America (Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia).  Some "garden web sites" report Oenothera versicolor as a Californian annual, which it is not, just more unsubstantiated garden lore. Google Oenothera campylocalyx, and you'll see many of the same orange cultivars.

I think Dave's "blood orange" evening primrose or O. "falklandica", is probably some other South America species of Oenothera, it has rather different leaves than the long narrow leaves of O. campylocalyx (syn. versicolor). The trouble is, its so hard to find botanical information for Central and South America.

Regarding O. fruticosa and ssp. glauca recognized by USDA Plant Profiles, they're good entities in my book, The Plant List has a surprising high percentage of "unresolved" plant names.
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=OEFR

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Got a reply from Bob Brown about Oenethera falklandica :
He tells me the seed was " bought from North Green Seeds. It must be somebodies made-up name maybe for something collected on the Falklands"  - he knows nothing more. 

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

Ugh!!!

Yes, of course, I should be more respectful of March  :-\

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Makes you wonder how the Dwarf Alberta Spruce does in Alberta....?

Actually, I didn't think you had that problem out east.  You have much more humid winters and springs than us in Minnesota.

Is it normal that one has to protect from winter sun there, too?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

Yes, I do wonder about Alberta.... Cohan; are you out there? I'm not sure covering plants for winter could ever be considered "normal" behavior  :o  but in some cases it might forestall burning. A burlap wrap might have prevented the burn but this plant will likely recover anyway. I just have to look at it for a few more weeks  :(  This common landscape plant is sometimes put right next to south wall in full sun where the burn really can do some serious damage. They're fine with any shading though.

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Dwarf Alberta spruce are a pretty poor bet around here in this dry chinook belt - most of those cute little green cones in the one-gallon pots are doomed from the moment they leave the store - but like everything, there is an exception here and there.  DH says there's a house in our neighbourhood with 2 of them in a sheltered front entrance that have been there at least 15 years and are head-high.  The backsides are dead (whether due to climate conditions or whether it's needle drop due to be being up against a wall or other trees is unclear) but the fronts look good, apparently.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I don't have any personal experience with dwarf conifers, so can't add much. I'll try to keep my eyes open for them when I am in town...As Lori suggests, I'd tend to think most people don't care for their planted conifers that well in the first place- neither do a lot of big box garden centres, for that matter- they may be on the way out before they even leave the store..
I don't see many wrapped shrubs here- I think it is done sometimes for some cedars (? not really sure what they are- but little pyramids very popularly sold  here, with a very very low survival rate!)..
Where in Alberta must make a big difference to woodies as well- more freeze/thaw farther south, colder farther north etc, besides vagaries of exposure in a particular property- eg my place is quite sheltered by trees, greatly reducing winter winds- my aunt up the road with a more exposed site feels we can grow many things she couldn't..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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