Weather 2012

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Schier
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Rick, more like "slew" as in "dew"
Much the same as you do by the way you write it eg. boo, dew
The word slough is absolutely "top drawer" isn't it? haha I really enjoy hearing or reading about local or regional words for things.

Faith S.   Gardening in central Alberta climate, from min. -44 c to max. 36+ C. ( not often! ) Avg. annual precip. ~ 48 cm  Altitude ~ 820 m. Have "frying pan gardens" up around the house, and also some woodland areas down the pa

RickR
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Joined: 2009-09-21

Yes, boo and dew are pronounced the same.  I should have made that clear.

I am quite the word freak, myself.  Grammar, colloquialisms, foreign languages, word derivations, cultural influences - I eat it all up!

"Bushes" have more of a wild connotation for me, although "bush" is never used in this region to mean anything more than a woody plant (as opposed to a land area), unless you're talking about Africa or Australia.  

In fact I was quite miffed when the program director of a nearby city's Horticulture Day changed the name of my talk from "Pruning Trees and Shrubs" to "Pruning Bushes and Trees" without my knowledge.  The next year she did it again with another talk and I had to change the focus of my presentation to fit her new title.  When I was approached the third year, I specified that she could not change the title of my presentation without my approval.  (Who would think that such a request would be necessary?)  She never responded.  Good riddance!  Some people are just so narrow minded as to think that their word definitions are the only ones possible.  

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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RickR wrote:

Yes, boo and dew are pronounced the same.  I should have made that clear.

I am quite the word freak, myself.  Grammar, colloquialisms, foreign languages, word derivations, cultural influences - I eat it all up!

"Bushes" have more of a wild connotation for me, although "bush" is never used in this region to mean anything more than a woody plant (as opposed to a land area), unless you're talking about Africa or Australia.  

In fact I was quite miffed when the program director of a nearby city's Horticulture Day changed the name of my talk from "Pruning Trees and Shrubs" to "Pruning Bushes and Trees" without my knowledge.  The next year she did it again with another talk and I had to change the focus of my presentation to fit her new title.  When I was approached the third year, I specified that she could not change the title of my presentation without my approval.  (Who would think that such a request would be necessary?)  She never responded.  Good riddance!  Some people are just so narrow minded as to think that their word definitions are the only ones possible.  

The last item first: I would say it is rude and very strange to change a title like that without consulting with the presenter first!

We use 'bush' as a loanword in Norwegian when referring to the scrubland in other parts of the world but also as a word for wilderness.

Your way of pronouncing the same letters in different ways (dew - few) and different letters in the same way (boo-dew) is astonishing ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Schier
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The word bush is quite interesting, isn't it? I'm afraid that more than likely a lot of the ways it's used around this area aren't proper grammatically, but still interesting...( Cohen, I haven't gone in the ditch for a long time, knock on wood! )

" Oh, he's up north or up in the bush " ( usually working in the oilfield ) meaning forest, muskeg, bush? not highly populated.  (Of course highly populated in this neck of the woods can mean 10-20 people per section of land.)  Could also mean west, or northwest getting closer to the Rocky Mountains and forest. As you mentioned Hoy, the wilderness....

" He's out brushing. " Can mean cutting/taking out bushes, small/large  trees in preparation for
  breaking the land .  I remember helping with this, horrible job!

" Scrub brush" often patches of  small nondescript bushes/shrubs. May also be known occasionally as buck brush.  Mostly weedy type small shrubs etc. 

So now, I have really made a mess of things! bush and brush.
Forest to me means a "real" forest, meaning evergreens.  I often think of the Whitecourt Forest.  And Cohen, getting over in your area as well, forest. I guess around here there are a few spots that verge on being forest area but it's more likely called bush, treed area, woodland.  When I think of forest I thing BIG...

Weather here today is lovely, too lovely for this time of year.  Scares me! Just a light breeze, no snow, and about 4 -5 deg. C.  I'm thinking that when the snow comes we'll  be shocked. 

Faith S.   Gardening in central Alberta climate, from min. -44 c to max. 36+ C. ( not often! ) Avg. annual precip. ~ 48 cm  Altitude ~ 820 m. Have "frying pan gardens" up around the house, and also some woodland areas down the pa

cohan
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Woods and forest are about the same to me- and both are 'foreign' words around here-- expected in fairytales ,think: 'Enchanted Forest'
or in more technical speech- eg. a discussion of 'Boreal Forest'.. woods doesn't mean much different to me, though it is  a more genteel term, most likely used for a tract of forest near civilisation, maybe tamer than forest, and probably more for poetry!
Here, its all bush, whether its deciduous or mixed forest (note the use of 'forest' since that's a more technical description...lol) and regardless of the size of the area- though if you can see out from all sides while standing in the middle, it probably wouldn't be called going into the bush...lol

Brush- as in 'clearing brush' or 'brush piles' or 'burning brush' (after its made into a 'brush pile' is also commonly used here-- leans a bit towards meaning undergrowth- which here means roses, many kinds of ribes, shepherdia, symphoricarpos, various prunus and saplings.. and in wet areas, see my comments above- would refer to willows, alders, betula etc... although once talking about clearing brush, it could really mean any unwanted woodies of any size, and brush piles can include mature trees too.. its almost more a description of the unwantedness of the woodies, in the locations they are in, rather than any particular kind of plants...

Absolutely beautiful here today, as well-- sunny, seasonally very warm- I was sweating on a gentle walk in the 'bush'! We were forecast to be 7C as it was yesterday, but it got to at least 10C...

Yes, slough rhymes with boo- or do;
due and dew could be do, but I lean more often to rhyming them with few...lol
I think its ridiculous to have re-named your talks, Rick-- she must have felt 'shrub' was too highbrow for the group....  :rolleyes:

A few  pics from today's walk.... you get an idea of how much the snow cover varies with different parts of the landscape; these aren't just random variations- these are patterns, and reflect typical (no doubt some annual differences due to wind)  zones of lighter and heavier snow cover, which has a significant impact on the plants-- mostly re: moisture levels.. Ruffed Grouse in the first image.. common and frequently seen here..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

The 7th day of the new year and still no frost in sight. But no sun either. . . .

Today I spotted the first crocuses with flowers but they are shut due to the rain.

Btw slough, boo and do would be written 'slu', 'bu' and 'du' in Norwegian (actually we have words written exactly like that but they mean: cunning, shed and you) ; and due and few would be written 'dju' and 'fju' respectively (such words don't exist in Norw). Much easier  ;D

Today I have also cut down two trees - a birch and a pine. Lot of work tidying up afterwards as they had many large branches.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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No one could ever claim English spelling is easy or straightforward-- but it is rich in history!..lol
Its been crazy mild here-- something like 10C today, and still tomorrow- though its supposed to rain tomorrow (its been forecast several times, and fortunately has never materialised-- still too much snow/ice for rain to be welcome!) and possibly snow later, and then temps drop considerably for at least a couple of days....

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Still no freezing but the road was covered by 10-15cm of sleet this morning. However, in my garden it had fallen just 2cm. Anyway, when I had finished my work for today it was all gone. The first rhododendron has showed its first flowers but the lack of sun keep them shut.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Yesterday (Sunday) was nearly 12C here, and today at least 10C (still lots of snow though!)
some shots from Sunday, showing how variable the snow cover is- the image with a clear line between the wooded and open area is very telling...
Then a shot of one of my (under construction) rock garden areas, and where most overwintering pots are sunk.. still mostly covered, though some parts are showing through.. then our gravel road, a mix of patches of packed icey snow and loose grave; the melting should be mostly over for now, though not much snow in the forecast yet.. today it was supposed to rain, luckily we dodged that, and temps drop after tonight...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Schier
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Joined: 2011-02-16

Cohan, we have about the same as you here, not surprisingly, although not the snow. Today is windy as the dickens again, and temps dropping, as they look to be all through the area and down to Calgary, etc.  My sister in Calgary says there was black ice this morning, some drifting, just plain nasty driving.  Winter is on the way???
My seventeen year old son asked me yesterday, " you don't suppose we might just be able to skip winter this year????" Not likely....

Faith S.   Gardening in central Alberta climate, from min. -44 c to max. 36+ C. ( not often! ) Avg. annual precip. ~ 48 cm  Altitude ~ 820 m. Have "frying pan gardens" up around the house, and also some woodland areas down the pa

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