Utah Oxytropis?

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Excellent examples Lori. The beaks are very well defined in your shots. Just be aware that they can be more subtle in some species. I hope this next example is large enough to view.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Very cool. 8)  Thanks so much!

Anything else?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Weiser wrote:

The beaks are very well defined in your shots. Just be aware that they can be more subtle in some species.

Good thing the ones I've looked at happened to be well defined ones!  
I'd like to know what to watch out for on the more subtle ones.  On the one you show, I'm not entirely clear on where the beak or notch is (versus the two petals that flank the keel), so I hope you don't mind that I have copied and annotated your photo (below) to ask my question... Is the notch/beak the bit outlined in blue (immediately left of the red arrow)?  (Or is the structure the blue arrow is touching?)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Lori
You are correct with the first outlined section. The red Arrow is pointing directly at the notch along the keel edge. It is not a sharp V shaped notch, I would describe it more as a slight in curving of the keel edge (An interuption to arc, so to speak) which then flares out slightly again, creating a lobe (or Beak) at the tip of the Keel.

By the way I have this ID-ed as Oxytropis borealis. Possibly (var. australis?) which is the variety found in the Sierra Nevada Range.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

This is all very interesting.  John, I thought that Oxytropis borealis had pinnately compound leaves, the subject plant has simple leaves as far as I can tell. I find this whole lot, Astagalus and Oxytropis bewildering. :)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

McDonough wrote:

This is all very interesting.  John, I thought that Oxytropis borealis had pinnately compound leaves, the subject plant has simple leaves as far as I can tell. I find this whole lot, Astagalus and Oxytropis bewildering. :)

I think the conversation is getting mixed up between "the plant in question" (Jane's) and the plant in the photo added by John to show flower characteristics of Oxytropis?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Got it, was following the thread close enough.  Thanks.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Just to add to the topic.  This is a picture of Astragalus spatulatus - a white form - which has been living quite happily in a trough in my garden.  It has been blooming reliably every year for many years.  The very definition of a great astragalus, coming from the west and settling happily in the northeast!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

What happened to the picture?  I'll try again.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

A beautiful specimen, Anne. 

By the way, you can always edit a previous post by clicking on "Modify".

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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