Unknown Leguminosae

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Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02
Unknown Leguminosae

Howdy all

I was given this plant earlier in the year --name on the label says Oxytropis sps.

I have a suspicion that in better light the flowering stem would be a lot shorter.
An ID would be appreciated .

Thanks.

Cheers Dave.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I won't pretend to have any idea what it is, but it seems sort of distinctive in having leafy bracts immediately under the inflorescence, and a very compact inflorescence.  Have all of the blooms been like that (assuming it has bloomed before or on multiple stems)?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Thank's a lot for your comments Lori .
First blooming for me on this single stem.

In the meantime i'll keep trawling through my reference material in the hope i luck it.... :)

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Possibly a form of the highly variable Anthyllis vulneraria, of which there are dozens of named subspecies, not all are recognized.  Looks like some photos I see on a Google search, such as this one on Wrightman Alpines site:
http://www.wrightmanalpines.com/plant/anthyllis-vulneraria-ssp-atlantis

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Yes, it could be an Anthyllis. I know it is very variable. Although it is native here they never look like this one but take a look here:

http://www.google.no/search?q=anthyllis+vulneraria+coccinea&hl=no&client...

Here is one example

From this site:
http://www.idehaven-khwm.dk/stenbeds-og-alpinplanter.htm

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Thanks Mark and Trond

Yes it could be an Anthyllis.Thanks

Here's my mystery plant again as well a a common Anthyllis currently flowering here for comparison.

They both have leafy bracts immediately under the compact inflorescence and as well as an entire leaf growing only from one side of the flowering stem.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

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